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Are there any advantages or disadvantages to explicitly having a FULL initialization list for your C++ object constructors? (Full as in you have all of your members listed, even if we're just using default constructors?)

For example, if I had the object:

class MyObject
{
    public: 
        MyObject();
    private:
        double _doub;
        Foo _foo;
        std::set<int> _intSet;
        int _int;
        Bar _bar;
}

Is there any difference from having my constructor be:

MyObject::MyObject():
    _doub(1.4), _foo("me"), _intSet(),
    _int(5), _bar() {};

versus only listing the objects I specifically need to set data on (or call non-default constructors for):

MyObject::MyObject():
    _doub(1.4), _foo("me"), _int(5) {};

If the Class only has objects that it uses the default constructor for, should I even set up an Initialization list?

For example:

class MyObject
{
    public: 
        MyObject();

    private:
        Foo _foo;
        std::set<int> _intSet;
        Bar _bar;
}

Is there a point to have a constructor as this?

MyObject::MyObject():
    _foo(), _intSet(), _bar() {};

Thanks.

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closed as not constructive by Charles Menguy, Bo Persson, gnat, dreamcrash, Blachshma Jan 4 '13 at 23:07

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About the last part: Not really, it's doing the same thing as it would without one, but you lose the "no user-defined constructor" status. –  chris Jan 4 '13 at 20:44
    
It only matters when value-initialization is intended –  K-ballo Jan 4 '13 at 20:46
    
Avoid using leading _ in identifiers, because any _ identifier followed by a capital is reserved for compiler use. If you like _, put it at the end of the identifier instead. –  Yakk Jan 4 '13 at 20:47
1  
@Yakk no need to disallow leading underscores; as you say it's only implementation reserved if it's followed by a capital letter. _snake_case won't have any issues. –  rubenvb Jan 4 '13 at 20:49
1  
@K-Ballo Just avoid using leading _, and __ anywhere, in identifiers. It is a simple rule that catches the problem. Yes, it also tells you not to use other things that are legal. The full rule is more complex -- but "avoid using leading _ followed by capital letters in identifiers, and avoid using __ anywhere in identifiers" is both much more verbose -- and incorrect! –  Yakk Jan 4 '13 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

The () initializer invokes "consructorless" value-initialization for objects with no user-defined constructor. So, for such objects the presence or absence of the explicit () initializer in the constructor initializer list makes a difference.

Arguments can be made for using the () initializer ("it is nice to keep everything as initialized as possible") and against it ("avoid gratuitous dummy initialization").

Personally, in cases when the behavior is the same with or without () initializer, I would avoid including the members into the constructor initializer list. Moreover, in cases when the behavior is different but I don't have a meaningful initializer for a specific member yet, I prefer to leave it uninitialized (instead of invoking value-initialization).

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+1 invoking value initialization using (), especially on POD-type arrays, can be handy if your compiler supports it (some like VS 2010, will do it, but say "this isn't standard yet" which, of course, is wrong because now it is standard-based, but wasn't then). –  WhozCraig Jan 4 '13 at 21:00

Disadvantage

class A {
public:
     A(); //Where A does not initialize members
     void initMembers(); //A function that initalizes everything
     void tellClassBName(); //Writes a line in the console with the name of b1
private:
     B b1;
     int aNumber;
}

Imagine creating an instance of class A. This object will hold no value for b1. Despite this you'll still be able to call tellClassBName() before you call initMembers() which will result in errors.

Doesn't seem that great without good documentation while working as a team.

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