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I am creating a database and this is my first time that I work with them.

I have one question about the one to one correspondence. I am creating a table that represents a team of a certain sport.

I want that every team will have only one arena where it plays matches and every team will have its own arena.

The arena will have many attributes (name, seats, ticket price and so on) so I would create a table for them even if I have read that the best practise to create a one to one relationship would be to put all in a single table.

Because an arena and a team are two so different concepts i would divide them into two tables in a way like this:

Club
--------------------
ClubID (PK)
ClubName
.
.
.
ArenaID (FK)


Arena
--------------------
ArenaID (PK)
ClubID (FK)
ArenaName
Seats
TicketPrice

Futhermore I thought to put the ArenaID not AutoIncremental but to put it equal to the ClubID because I will create the Arena automatically when a Club will be created. Is it reasonable?

I want to understand well this type of relationship because it will be used also on other cases (for example every team will always have also one Assistant Coach with his skills).

Thanks to all!

Edit:

@Kevin Bowersox I was only specifying how the game will be, and I thank you for your answer.

@Peter Gluck You should think the arena as an attribute of the club, but it has other own attributes and I want to separate it from the club table to organize better the database. If a club wants to "build" another arena, it simply changes the name of the actual arena and it can change number of seats and ticket price. But the "object" saved in the database will remain the same. Only some columns will be changed.

@Branko Dimitrijevic Thanks for the detailed answer. I want to ask you some questions for better understand what you said (I am starting now to use databases). In the first example you don't use two key for both tables that will be, alternatively, one a primary key and the other a foreign key, but you use an only key that is, at the same time, primary and foreign key, is it correct? And what is the difference between these two choices? Then, you say that it would be better if I put all in single table if I won't have much team, but i I hope that i will have tens (or maybe hundreds) of thousands teams. In this case is this an enough large number to split the tables? I say this because I have more than only this one to one relationship in this table, so if I put all these one to one relationships in the same table it will be very very large..

Thanks to all for your suggestions, now I will try to use the method with two tables and two different ID keys. But I will use in other tables the method suggested by ypercube!

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How will you have any games if teams can't go to other arenas? –  ceejayoz Jan 4 '13 at 20:51
    
@ceejayoz Team 1 vs Team 2, determine the home team and join to their arena. Its not all expressed in the question, but it will work. –  Kevin Bowersox Jan 4 '13 at 21:03
    
Honestly the best way to learn this is to do it and see how it works, then fix it and see how that works, over and over. That's really how you get experience. The structure of a database depends on how you want to use it and access/process the data. You may have requirements now, but what will they be in the future? Remember to think with flexibility and be sure to make it so that you are comfortable with it and can think with it - especially if you'll be using it a lot. –  Peter Jan 4 '13 at 21:12
    
Yes, PK is also FK. Obviously, that makes it impossible to insert any new data unless the cycle is broken using deferred constraints (which are not supported under MySQL). Hundreds of thousands of teams still counts as "small" on modern hardware, but (as always) measure before deciding... BTW, I was answering under the assumption that you really need the 1:1 relationship. If you happen to need 1:0..1 or 0..1:0..1, this changes the whole equation and other answers have provided some good points in that direction. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jan 8 '13 at 17:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I like the idea of splitting up these tables. It will make your object model work much better.

However, in regards to:

Futhermore I thought to put the ArenaID not AutoIncremental but to put it equal to the ClubID because I will create the Arena automatically when a Club will be created. Is it reasonable?

I would keep the ArenaID as its own auto integer. What happens if a club switches arenas? This is just one scenario that could cause these keys to become out of sync. I have a feeling over the course of time you will be manually adjusting some of these keys using this approach. Keep your relational database, just that, RELATIONAL and do not rely upon circumstance.

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Can’t fault this answer—says pretty much what I wanted to. –  Martin Bean Jan 4 '13 at 21:03
    
A team can not change the arena because it can change the name and the dimension of its arena, so there will be a forever one to one relationship. The arena is only the plays that determines your income when you play at home. But it will be always editable. –  Ikki Jan 4 '13 at 21:08
    
@Ikki I'm not contesting the concept of a one to one relationship, but I would be very prudent with how I manage those keys. –  Kevin Bowersox Jan 4 '13 at 21:23
2  
@Ikki Suppose the team builds a new arena to play in? And suppose they want to pre-sell tickets in the new arena before it opens while they are playing in the old one? Objects that are inherently different should have their own keys regardless of their relationships. –  Peter Gluck Jan 4 '13 at 22:23

On a DBMS that supports deferrable constraints, a true "1 to 1" could be implemented using circular foreign keys:

CREATE TABLE Club (
    ClubId INT PRIMARY KEY
    -- Other fields...
);

CREATE TABLE Arena (
    ClubId INT PRIMARY KEY REFERENCES Club (ClubId)
    -- Other fields...
);

ALTER TABLE Club ADD FOREIGN KEY (ClubId)
    REFERENCES Arena (ClubId)
    DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

The FK Club -> Arena is not enforced until the transaction end, so you can insert Club and then Arena without running into the chicken-and-egg problem.


Unfortunately, you won't be able to implement a true "1 to 1" relationships in MySQL since it doesn't support deferred constraints and therefore you won't be able to solve the chicken-and-egg problem when inserting new data in the presence of circular FKs necessary for the true "1 to 1".

You won't even be able to truly rely on the solution you proposed, since MySQL doesn't enforce CHECK constraints, so you can't enforce the equality between ClubId and ArenaId. Probably the best you can do is rely on your application logic to enforce that, opening you to potential bugs.

Using alternate keys (i.e. UNIQUE constraints) won't help either, because:

CREATE TABLE Club (
    ClubId INT PRIMARY KEY,
    ArenaId INT UNIQUE
    -- Other fields...
);

CREATE TABLE Arena (
    ArenaId INT PRIMARY KEY,
    ClubId INT NOT NULL UNIQUE REFERENCES Club (ClubId)
    -- Other fields...
);

ALTER TABLE Club ADD FOREIGN KEY (ArenaId)
    REFERENCES Arena (ArenaId);

INSERT INTO Club (ClubId) VALUES (1);
INSERT INTO Club (ClubId) VALUES (2);
INSERT INTO Club (ClubId) VALUES (3);

INSERT INTO Arena (ArenaId, ClubId) VALUES (1, 2);
INSERT INTO Arena (ArenaId, ClubId) VALUES (2, 3);
INSERT INTO Arena (ArenaId, ClubId) VALUES (3, 1);

UPDATE Club SET ArenaId = 2 WHERE ClubId = 1;
UPDATE Club SET ArenaId = 3 WHERE ClubId = 2;
UPDATE Club SET ArenaId = 1 WHERE ClubId = 3;

Now you have a club (ClubId = 1) that points to an arena (ArenaId = 2) that points to a different club (ClubId = 3)! Etc...

Even if it worked, secondary indexes in clustered tables can be expensive, and all InnoDB tables are clustered.


The "vertical partitioning" you proposed is usually done to better utilize the cache, when one subset of fields is queried much more than the other and the number of rows is large. Even if you have that special pattern of querying, I doubt you'll have enough teams to bump into the cache issue. You should really reconsider and put everything in just one table.

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I have commented your post in the main question, could you answer me? Because your comment is very useful and I would like further advices.. –  Ikki Jan 6 '13 at 19:35

You appear to understand the concepts well. You are indeed looking at the appropriate considerations to drive your decision. Just make sure that the assumptions you are making are correct, and will remain correct.. (i.e., will the individual who is asst coach for Team B NEVER be allowed to be asst. coach for another team? If the answer to these questions is always yes, for all relationships, then they can indeed be modeled as one to one, (and in fact, you could put them all as attributes of a single team table with no loss of functionality), but be careful, very seldom are assumptions like this actually true, and destined to remain true over time as applications and data models evolve...

Assuming that this really is one to one, then the only reason I would consider splitting them into separate tables is for performance. Say one (smaller) set of attributes is to be accessed hundreds of times per second whereas the bulk of the attributes are fairly stable and are accessed much less frequently. Then you could put the more frequently accessed attributes in a smaller and narrower table for better read and write performance. Separating the attributes purely for logical or organizational esthetics is not somethong I would do...

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You say (in a comment): "A team can not change the arena because it can change the name and the dimension of its arena, so there will be a forever one to one relationship."

Never say never or forever. Requirements change.

I agree with @Peter Gluck's comment that "Objects that are inherently different should have their own keys regardless of their relationships"

In accordance with the two previous obsevations, I'd keep separate table for all three Objects/Entities: Club, Arena and ClubPlaysInArena. Your (current) restriction of 1-1 relationship between Clubs and Arenas will be preserved by two Unique constraints which can be lifted if requirements change. No further changes will be needed in the design:

Club
--------------------
ClubID (PK)
ClubName
.
.

Arena
--------------------
ArenaID (PK)
ArenaName
Seats
.
.

ClubPlaysInArena
--------------------
ClubID  (PK, UQ1, FK1)
ArenaID (PK, UQ2, FK2)
.
.

Bonus point: You can have newly built arenas without an associated club (and clubs without an arena) stored in your database.

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Probably this is a very trivial question, but I have to ask you. Why do you assign in ClubPlaysInArena table the UQ attribute to the ID's? Is not Unique attribute equal to Primary Key? –  Ikki Jan 8 '13 at 20:50
    
The primary key is the (ClubID, ArenaID). But there are 2 unique constraints, one on (ClubID) and one on (ArenaID). These ensure that every Club has at most one associated Arena and every Arena has at most one associated Club. Thus the Club and Arena have 1-1 relationship (to be more precise not a strict 1-1 but a 0..1::0..1 as there can be clubs without arena and arenas without club in this design). If you (later) lift one of the two UQ constraints, the relationship becomes 1-to-many. If you lift both, it becomes many-to-many. –  ypercube Jan 8 '13 at 22:50
    
So we have to assign the UK attribute to ClubID and ArenaID in the ClubPlaysInArena table because they are, together, the primary key and this fact grants that the COUPLE will be unique. So for example (if C1, C2 are two ClubID's and A1, A2 two ArenaID's) there could be only a (C1,A1) couple in the table, but the couples (C2,A1) and (C1,A2) could be stored in the table?? –  Ikki Jan 9 '13 at 20:27
    
Yes and No. Once you insert the (C1, A1) couple, you can longer add a (C1, whatever) couple (because of the Unique constraint on ClubID and also you can no longer add a (whatever, A1) couple because of the Unique constraint on ArenaID. The Primary Key constraint (on (ClubID, ArenaID)) seems redundant (and it is!) but it won't be redundant later, if you remove any or both of the unique constraints. –  ypercube Jan 9 '13 at 20:32

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