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I have the following datatable - Let's say called MyTable:

Col1:    Col2:    Col3:    Col4:
1        abc      def      <null>
2        abc      def      ghi
1        abc      def      <null>
3        abc      def      <null>
1        abc      def      <null>

And I'm trying to get the distinct rows:

Col1:    Col2:    Col3:    Col4:
1        abc      def      <null>
2        abc      def      ghi
3        abc      def      <null>

I tried the following LINQ statement:

MyTable = (From dr As DataRow In MyTable Select dr).Distinct.CopyToDataTable

But it's returning the original datatable with the repeated rows back to me.

What am I doing wrong AND how can I get my desired output??

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check this - stackoverflow.com/questions/3242892/… – rs. Jan 4 '13 at 21:38
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Distinct relies on the objects all implementing IEquatable and/or having sensible implementations of GetHashCode and Equals. The DataRow class...doesn't. It doesn't check that the value of each column is equal in the Equals method, it just uses the default implementation, which is to say that it checks that the references are equal, and that's not what you want.

You can provide your own IEqualityComparer, since you can't change the methods in DataRow.

The following should work, if you provide an instance of it to to Distinct:

public class DataRowComparer : IEqualityComparer<DataRow>
{
    public bool Equals(DataRow x, DataRow y)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < x.Table.Columns.Count; i++)
        {
            if (!object.Equals(x[i], y[i]))
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(DataRow obj)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int output = 23;
            for (int i = 0; i < obj.Table.Columns.Count; i++)
            {
                output += 19 * obj[i].GetHashCode();
            }
            return output;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @Servy - Makes sense... How could I get my desired result? I'm guessing i'm going to have to look at ItemArray, but can't figure out how to do it... – John Bustos Jan 4 '13 at 21:38

Try like this;

var distinctRows = (from DataRow dRow in MyTable.Rows
                    select new {col1=dRow["Col1"],col2=dRow["Col2"], col3=dRow["Col3"], col4=dRow["Col4"]}).Distinct();

foreach (var row in distinctRows) 
{
 //
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Soner - I found this solution online in a few places, but my example really trivialized the problem - My real datatable has about 20 columns... Is there a way to do it without having to mention each column explicitly?? – John Bustos Jan 4 '13 at 21:41
    
@JohnBustos Hmm.. I'm not sure but check stackoverflow.com/questions/1681715/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/1044236/… – Soner Gönül Jan 4 '13 at 21:44
    
@JohnBustos Yes, there is a way to do it without mentioning each option. See my answer. It should work for any datatable. – Servy Jan 4 '13 at 21:46

The problem is that every DataRow in your DataTable is a different object. Each is an instance.

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Although @Servy's question truly was the correct way to do this - Thank you so much Servy! I also found another solution that at least seemed cleaner:

    MyTable = MyTable.DefaultView.ToTable(True)

This allows you to ask for only distinct records, but negates by original request of doing it via LINQ - Figured I'd add it in for anyone else looking at this question in the future.

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