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Why does the following code execute sequentially?

List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();

for (int i = 0; i <= max; i += block)
{
    if (i + block >= max)
        tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Count(ref counter, block)));
    else
        block = max - i;
}

Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());

I have also tested a version of this using Parallel.Invoke; it, too, fails to execute in parallel. There's bound to be something I'm not understanding, but when I try Googling this, I mostly get instructions on how to force sequential execution.

As a response to one of the caveats given in an answer below, I have included the following method for reference:

static void Count(ref int counter, int num)
{
    int localCounter = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        if (Coin()) localCounter++;
    System.Threading.Interlocked.Add(ref counter, localCounter);
}

Edited again: Thank you all!

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How many CPUs/cores do you have? –  Eric Petroelje Jan 4 '13 at 22:03
3  
How quick is Count? –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '13 at 22:07
    
What evidence do you have that it's not being parallelized? The issue could be in your observation of what's happening, not what's actually happening. –  Servy Jan 4 '13 at 22:07
    
In response to your edit, what's Coin and how long does it take to execute. Also, what's block? Is it likely to be a large number, a small number, 0, or what? Also note the Interlocked call will add a degree of synchronization between all of the tasks, limiting potential parallelization. –  Servy Jan 4 '13 at 22:10
1  
Can you provide a complete code sample? –  aquinas Jan 4 '13 at 22:16

3 Answers 3

why does the following code execute sequentially?

It doesn't, unless you have something within the Count method that's synchronizing access to a single resource. If it can be parallelized, then this will run in parallel.

If Count executes very quickly then you'll find that the tasks are finished faster than new tasks get scheduled, which is why they may all execute in order.

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If only that were the case! I would expect to see 100% core utilization for parallel execution of something like this, but what I actually get is 12.5%, which is exactly one thread. Unfortunately, I don't have the concurrency visualizer available to me in my IDE, so that's the best evidence I've got. I will edit my question to include the count method. –  archer884 Jan 4 '13 at 22:07
1  
@user1949917 If the tasks are being completed very quickly then I would expect to see 12.5% utilization. If the time it takes to process one iteration is small, but the number of iterations is large, you should have each task handle multiple iterations, not just one. –  Servy Jan 4 '13 at 22:09

Just replace tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Count(ref counter, block))); with Console.WriteLine and debug your code.

You never create more than one task.

for (int i = 0; i <= max; i += block)
{
    if (i + block >= max)
        Console.WriteLine(i);
    else
        block = max - i;

}
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1  
You're right about that. –  archer884 Jan 4 '13 at 22:21

Seems to me there is something wrong with your loop/if statement:

for (int i = 0; i <= max; i += block)
{
    if (i + block >= max)
        tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Count(ref counter, block)));
    else
        block = max - i;
}

If I am reading it right, you will only add a task if i + block >= max and you will only loop if i + block <= max (showing both the counter increase and the condition check). As such you will only add a task once.

In addition, you are changing block when you are not adding a task. I expect you want something more like the following, though I can not be sure without more code:

for (int i = 0; i <= max; i += block)
{
    tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Count(ref counter, block)));
    if (i + block >= max) { block = max - i; }
}
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