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I'm using the GPUImage library by Brad Larson, and I think I've found an interesting problem.

The following shader program executes just fine:

NSString *const kDilationFragmentShaderString = SHADER_STRING
(
 precision highp float;
 uniform int height;
 uniform int width;
 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;
 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;
 uniform int radius;


 void main (void)
 {
   vec2 uv = textureCoordinate;
   vec2 theSize = vec2(width, height);
   vec3 theMax = texture2D(inputImageTexture, uv).rgb;
   gl_FragColor = vec4(theMax, 1.0);
 }
);

This version, however, crashes on large images (ie, a 4x3 image from the camera resized to 2560 on the longest side). To my mind, the only thing significantly different is the set of texture2D calls:

NSString *const kDilationFragmentShaderString = SHADER_STRING
(
 precision highp float;
 uniform int height;
 uniform int width;
 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;
 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;
 uniform int radius;


 void main (void)
 {
   vec2 uv = textureCoordinate;
   vec2 theSize = vec2(width, height);
   vec3 theMax = texture2D(inputImageTexture, uv).rgb;

   int i;
   int j;
   int radsqr = radius*radius;
   for (j = -radius; j <= radius; ++j)  {
     for (i = -radius; i <= radius; ++i)  {
       if (i * i + j * j > radsqr) continue;
       theMax = max(theMax, texture2D(inputImageTexture, uv + vec2(i,j)/theSize).rgb);
     }
   }

   gl_FragColor = vec4(theMax, 1.0);

 }
 );

I'm running this filter, and then a second filter with a minimum (ie, morphological dilation and then an erosion, or a morphological close operator).

I do realize that a more optimal way to implement this is to try to get all the texture2D calls into their own locations via the vertex shader; however, if the radius is 10, that calls for 314 vertices, which blows past the allowed number of locations. If I run these in the simulator and all other things are equal, then the first finishes just fine, but the second code blows memory up and the memory climbs dramatically for the call of the erosion filter. Running on an iPhone 4s, the first code fragment finishes just fine (and of course, very quickly), but the second code fragment crashes after the dilation, and does not run the erosion call.

Initially, it looks like texture2D is leaking; however, these functions are being called in a thread. When the thread exits, all memory is cleared in the simulator. As a result, the functions, if they work right the first time, can be run multiple times with no problem.

So my question is this: What is the texture2D call doing there that could cause this behavior? Is there a way to flush whatever buffer is created once the filter has completed, independently of ending the thread between calls?

EDIT: Something I've learned in the week since posting this question: The problem is in the for loops themselves. Remove the for loops, and the memory problem disappears. That is,

NSString *const kDilationFragmentShaderString = SHADER_STRING
(
 precision highp float;
 uniform int height;
 uniform int width;
 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;
 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;
 uniform int radius;


 void main (void)
 {
   vec2 uv = textureCoordinate;
   vec2 theSize = vec2(width, height);
   vec3 theMax = texture2D(inputImageTexture, uv).rgb;

   int i;
   int j;
   int radsqr = radius*radius;
   for (j = -radius; j <= radius; ++j)  {
     for (i = -radius; i <= radius; ++i)  {
     }
   }

   gl_FragColor = vec4(theMax, 1.0);

 }
 );

will allocate as much memory as if there were something happening inside of the loop. I'm determining this behavior through the inspector on the simulator. When I run a shader with no for loops on a 1280x1280 image, I get a total of 202 mb allocated, and when I run it with for loops, I get 230 mb allocated, regardless of what happens inside the for loop. The same behavior happens with while loops as well.

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1  
Have you tried running the static analyzer on your project. Just hit Analyze instead of Run. It's really good for spotting static memory allocations that aren't released. –  Fogmeister Jan 4 '13 at 22:09
2  
@Fogmeister-- This is inside the fragment shader, so the analyzer does not get in there. –  mmr Jan 4 '13 at 23:13
    
Ah, sorry, thought it might help. –  Fogmeister Jan 4 '13 at 23:14
    
@Fogmeister-- well, let me put it this way-- the analyzer didn't say anything was wrong. Maybe it did get in there. I wish it were that easy :) –  mmr Jan 4 '13 at 23:40
    
A Shader runs by definition in the GPU, so it can not allocate memory, it can only use registers and texture lookups. What you might see in the Simulator is the software emulation of the shader if at all. If your App crashes on the device it might be simple memory exhaustion because of chaining of filters, every item in the chain needs a new fbo for output storage, so it allocates the complete image size from the memory for every step. If freeing is not fast enough your app may use up all memory there is. –  Dunkelstern Jan 16 '13 at 13:10

1 Answer 1

If you want to flush things, you can call glFlush() and it will flush the OpenGL command queue for the current context. The other thing you can do is tile your image and work on smaller pieces at a time. This is how applications like Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, and others work, and it can be very memory efficient.

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