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When working on a hierarchical/multilevel/panel dataset, it may be very useful to adopt a package which returns the within- and between-group standard deviations of the available variables.

This is something that with the following data in Stata can be easily done through the command

xtsum, i(momid)

I made a research, but I cannot find any R package which can do that..

edit:

Just to fix ideas, an example of hierarchical dataset could be this:

son_id       mom_id      hispanic     mom_smoke     son_birthweigth

  1            1            1            1              3950
  2            1            1            0              3890
  3            1            1            0              3990
  1            2            0            1              4200
  2            2            0            1              4120
  1            3            0            0              2975
  2            3            0            1              2980

The "multilevel" structure is given by the fact that each mother (higher level) has two or more sons (lower level). Hence, each mother defines a group of observations.

Accordingly, each dataset variable can vary either between and within mothers or only between mothers. birtweigth varies among mothers, but also within the same mother. Instead, hispanic is fixed for the same mother.

For example, the within-mother variance of son_birthweigth is:

# mom1 means
    bwt_mean1 <- (3950+3890+3990)/3
    bwt_mean2 <- (4200+4120)/2
    bwt_mean3 <- (2975+2980)/2

# Within-mother variance for birthweigth
    ((3950-bwt_mean1)^2 + (3890-bwt_mean1)^2 + (3990-bwt_mean1)^2 + 
    (4200-bwt_mean2)^2 + (4120-bwt_mean2)^2 + 
    (2975-bwt_mean3)^2 + (2980-bwt_mean3)^2)/(7-1)

While the between-mother variance is:

# overall mean of birthweigth:
# mean <- sum(data$son_birthweigth)/length(data$son_birthweigth)
    mean <- (3950+3890+3990+4200+4120+2975+2980)/7

# within variance:
    ((bwt_mean1-mean)^2 + (bwt_mean2-mean)^2 + (bwt_mean3-mean)^2)/(3-1)
share|improve this question
    
do you mean raw moments or estimates from a hierarchical model? If the latter, does VarCorr do what you want (from nlme::lme or lme4::lmer)? – Ben Bolker Jan 4 '13 at 22:18
    
I mean the sample moments of the empirical distributions of variables, where each variable's overall standard deviation can be split into the within- and between-cluster components. – Stezzo Jan 5 '13 at 0:59
    
@Stezzo yes you give the data. It would better to give also the expected result. It is not clear, do you want to compute the moments of son_birthweigth over other categorical variables? – agstudy Jan 5 '13 at 14:15
    
@ agstudy I put a numerical example for making things clearer. Thanks for any additional help – Stezzo Jan 5 '13 at 15:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know what your stata command should reproduce, but to answer the second part of question about hierarchical structure , it is easy to do this with list. For example, you define a structure like this:

tree = list(
      "var1" = list(
         "panel" = list(type ='p',mean = 1,sd=0)
         ,"cluster" = list(type = 'c',value = c(5,8,10)))
      ,"var2" = list(
          "panel" = list(type ='p',mean = 2,sd=0.5)
         ,"cluster" = list(type="c",value =c(1,2)))
)

To create this lapply is convinent to work with list

tree <- lapply(list('var1','var2'),function(x){ 
  ll <- list(panel= list(type ='p',mean = rnorm(1),sd=0), ## I use symbol here not name
             cluster= list(type = 'c',value = rnorm(3)))  ## R prefer symbols
})
names(tree) <-c('var1','var2')

You can view he structure with str

str(tree)
List of 2
 $ var1:List of 2
  ..$ panel  :List of 3
  .. ..$ type: chr "p"
  .. ..$ mean: num 0.284
  .. ..$ sd  : num 0
  ..$ cluster:List of 2
  .. ..$ type : chr "c"
  .. ..$ value: num [1:3] 0.0722 -0.9413 0.6649
 $ var2:List of 2
  ..$ panel  :List of 3
  .. ..$ type: chr "p"
  .. ..$ mean: num -0.144
  .. ..$ sd  : num 0
  ..$ cluster:List of 2
  .. ..$ type : chr "c"
  .. ..$ value: num [1:3] -0.595 -1.795 -0.439

Edit after OP clarification

I think that package reshape2 is what you want. I will demonstrate this here.

The idea here is in order to do the multilevel analysis we need to reshape the data.

First to divide the variables into two groups :identifier and measured variables. library(reshape2) dat.m <- melt(dat,id.vars=c('son_id','mom_id')) ## other columns are measured

str(dat.m)
'data.frame':   21 obs. of  4 variables:
 $ son_id  : Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 ...
 $ mom_id  : Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 1 1 1 ...
 $ variable: Factor w/ 3 levels "hispanic","mom_smoke",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 ...
 $ value   : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ..

Once your have data in "moten" form , you can "cast" to rearrange it in the shape that you want:

# mom1 means for all variable
 acast(dat.m,variable~mom_id,mean)
                           1    2      3
hispanic           1.0000000    0    0.0
mom_smoke          0.3333333    1    0.5
son_birthweigth 3943.3333333 4160 2977.5
# Within-mother variance for birthweigth

acast(dat.m,variable~mom_id,function(x) sum((x-mean(x))^2))
                           1    2    3
hispanic           0.0000000    0  0.0
mom_smoke          0.6666667    0  0.5
son_birthweigth 5066.6666667 3200 12.5

## overall mean of each variable
acast(dat.m,variable~.,mean)
[,1]
hispanic           0.4285714
mom_smoke          0.5714286
son_birthweigth 3729.2857143
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much! – Stezzo Jan 5 '13 at 21:47
    
just glancing quickly over this -- are you sure you want sum((x-mean(x))^2) rather than var(x)? – Ben Bolker Jan 5 '13 at 23:38
    
You are right about the variance, the overall procedure seems ok though – Stezzo Jan 6 '13 at 0:03

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