Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to search two mysql columns, first and last name, for a user specified search term. Here's my query:

SELECT *
FROM (`users`)
WHERE `id` != '592'
AND  CONCAT(first,' ',last)  LIKE '%Bob Sm%'
LIMIT 4

However this returns no results even though there is a user account with the first name 'bob' and last name 'smith'.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Flexo, shiplu.mokadd.im, Frank van Puffelen, Jeremy Roman, Tomasz Wojtkowiak Jan 6 '13 at 15:08

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5 Answers 5

If you check your data in your database bob and smith stored in lower case and you are trying to fetch data for Bob Sm contains both uppercase and lowercase. Convert both the data either in upper case or in lower case to compare.

Try this:

SELECT * FROM users
WHERE id != '592' AND LOWER(CONCAT(first, ' ', last)) LIKE LOWER('%Bob Sm%')
LIMIT 4
share|improve this answer

i think your problem is with the id value 592 , should be without quotes

   SELECT *
  FROM `users`
  WHERE `id` != 592
  AND  CONCAT(first,' ',last)  LIKE '%Bob Sm%'
   LIMIT 4
share|improve this answer
up vote 4 down vote accepted

My bad, turns out bob smith's user id was 592, all other accounts work.

share|improve this answer

The comparison is case-sensitive, so you're going to have to force everything to one case, either upper or lower.

share|improve this answer

If you want to search two columns, why are you concatenating?

SELECT *
FROM (`users`)
WHERE `id` != '592'
  AND first like '%Bob%'
  AND last like '%Smith%'
  LIMIT 4

Not only you will get into all sorts of troubles where someone has put double first name, but you will also miss the index (if you have one, of course).

share|improve this answer
    
Because the input might come from one input field ('name') instead of two ('firstname' and 'lastname'). –  bart Dec 28 '14 at 22:02

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.