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I'm trying to insert a entity into my database with Entity Framework. See below:

private void InsertarIntoDataBase()
{

    Juego game = db.games.First(g => g.Id == anId);
    Day d = new Day {
                       DayNumber = this.Number,
                       Game = game // This is a relationship. One Day has one game 
                    };
    db.AddToDay(d);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

This is always for an insert, not an update. The first time that I run my app, it works, afterwards it stops working, throwing this exception An error occurred while updating the entries. See the InnerException for details.. (I'm really sure that I did not change anything).

Why does the framework think I'm updating? And what am I wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It doesn't mean that you are doing an Update, that just means a SQL error occurred. You need to read the inner exception to find out what the actual error is. From the looks of it, it may be something related to a primary key, or foreign key constraint, ie. you are adding an item and that primary key is already in the table. But again, the actual error will give you more details.

If you are running in Visual Studio it should automatically break on the exception and you can expand the inner exception property. If not you can put a try/catch block and log it to a file or write to a console. Exception.ToString() will show all inner exceptions as well, as SQL errors tend to wrap the true error inside a few different exceptions.

private void InsertarIntoDataBase()
{
    try 
    {
        Juego game = db.games.First(g => g.Id == anId);
        Day d = new Day {
                           DayNumber = this.Number,
                           Game = game // This is a relationship. One Day has one game 
                        };
        db.AddToDay(d);
        db.SaveChanges();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e); // or log to file, etc.
        throw; // re-throw the exception if you want it to continue up the stack
    }
}
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You should never catch System.Exception. Always catch a specific exception. –  David Anderson - DCOM Jan 5 '13 at 5:25
    
@DavidAnderson You catch a specific exception if you want to handle that type of exception in a specific manner. Since the asker doesn't know the reason why his SaveChanges failed, I suggested catching the exception and logging it somewhere to get the true cause. A simple solution to a simple problem. –  Despertar Jan 5 '13 at 18:51
    
You should never catch System.Exception, you should always let it propagate up the stack. These are bugs that should be handled by debugging and testing. See this Msdn topic as a quick reference (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229005.aspx). There are countless resources on why you should not do this, including here on SO. –  David Anderson - DCOM Jan 5 '13 at 19:50
    
I would say catching any exception, and doing nothing with it is bad practice because you are hiding the error, but when you catch it and log it, you can then continue on OR re-throw the exception up the stack. I'll edit to show that choice, but I don't know anything about his program and what it is supposed to do so I leave that decision to the author. –  Despertar Jan 5 '13 at 20:21
3  
Saying "Never" regardless of context seems a bit absolute here. It doesn't take much imagination to think of scenarios where this is very hard to avoid. Handling undefined 3rd party plugins that could throw anything for example. Or at the final point of contact in a webservice (allowing full exception and stack trace details to leak out is not a good thing). Rules of thumb are good. Blind adherence is not. –  Chris Rogers Jul 30 '13 at 0:00
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SaveChanges will throw a System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbUpdateException if your update command fails, and it wraps a System.Data.UpdateException that finally wraps a System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException. It is also important to make a note that the inner-inner exception can be something other than a SqlException depending on the Entity Framework provider you are using.

If you unwrap these, you can get down to the raw SqlError objects that give you the specific details about problems with your update.

try 
{
    db.SaveChanges();
}
catch (DbUpdateException ex) 
{
    UpdateException updateException = (UpdateException)ex.InnerException;
    SqlException sqlException = (SqlException)updateException.InnerException;

    foreach (SqlError error in sqlException.Errors)
    {
        // TODO: Do something with your errors
    }
}

You can also gain a lot of power and control by also catching System.Data.Entity.Validation.DbEntityValidationException which will show you any validation errors that occurred during the call to SaveChanges. The default behavior is to validate changes on save. You can also pre-validate changes by calling DbContext.GetValidationErrors().

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Based on Despertar's answer I could solved my problem. Entity Framework has an option called StoreGeneratedPattern. This option indicates the behavior when need to set an primary key id. By default this option is "None", so if you want the autoincrement, set the option StoreGeneratedPattern as "Identity" . This is the link that I've read.

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Yes ... Always make sure that if our entities has guids then 'StoreGeneratedPattern' has to set with value "Identity". because by default sqlserver doesnot add values for guid columns.

It can be set from edmx by selecting entity-right click-properties-select guid column-set storedGeneratedPattern to identity.

Or by assigning 'Guid.newGuid()' value to column from code itself. ex. product.Id = Guid.newGuid();

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