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I have a few equations that I have running in a CPU-based program to process images for iOS. The output is in the form:

for (y = 0; y < rows; ++y){
  for (x = 0; x < cols; ++x){
    <do math>
    outputImage[y*cols + x] += <some result>
    outputImage[y*cols + (x+1)] += <some result>
    outputImage[(y+1)*cols + x] += <some result>
  }
}

I think that this code can (and should) be thrown onto the GPU, probably via GPUImage. The trick is the outputs-- from my understanding, I can only put the results of a shader into gl_FragColor. Is it possible to write a fragment shader that puts results into more than one pixel on the output? Where can I find an example of that technique?

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1 Answer 1

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Is it possible to write a fragment shader that puts results into more than one pixel on the output?

No. Shaders are designed to work individually. That is why they are so fast.

You should refactor your algorithm to be "shader friendly". Try to extract the inputs so they could feed the algorithm calculating a single value for a single fragment. Try to avoid branching and looping, otherwise it might be a good idea to keep the calculations on the CPU.

Assuming <do math> takes x and y as an input, these could be obtained from gl_FragCoord. And if <some result> is an output of <do math> your shader program could look something like this:

vec4 location = getLocation(gl_FragCoord);
gl_FragColor += do_math(location.x, location.y);
gl_FragColor += do_math(location.x-1, location.y);
gl_FragColor += do_math(location.x, location.y-1);

Note the subtraction instead of addition. In such way fragment is calculating it's own value completely instead of modifying the neighbours.

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@Kimi-- I was worried about that, but it looks like I'll have to suck it up. –  mmr Jan 6 '13 at 19:28

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