Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
  char * ptr;

  ptr = "hello";


  printf("%p %s" ,"hello",ptr );

  getchar();

}

Hi, I am trying to understand clearly how can arrays get assign in to pointers. I notice when you assign an array of chars to a pointer of chars ptr="hello"; the array decays to the pointer, but in this case I am assigning a char of arrays that are not inside a variable and not a variable containing them ", does this way of assignment take a memory address specially for "Hello" (what obviously is happening) , and is it possible to modify the value of each element in "Hello" wich are contained in the memory address where this array is stored. As a comparison, is it fine for me to assign a pointer with an array for example of ints something as vague as thisint_ptr = 5,3,4,3; and the values 5,3,4,3 get located in a memory address as "Hello" did. And if not why is it possible only with strings? Thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
    
Read section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ. –  Keith Thompson Jan 5 '13 at 5:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"hello" is a string literal. It is a nameless non-modifiable object of type char [6]. It is an array, and it behaves the same way any other array does. The fact that it is nameless does not really change anything. You can use it with [] operator for example, as in "hello"[3] and so on. Just like any other array, it can and will decay to pointer in most contexts.

You cannot modify the contents of a string literal because it is non-modifiable by definition. It can be physically stored in read-only memory. It can overlap other string literals, if they contain common sub-sequences of characters.

Similar functionality exists for other array types through compound literal syntax

int *p = (int []) { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

In this case the right-hand side is a nameless object of type int [5], which decays to int * pointer. Compound literals are modifiable though, meaning that you can do p[3] = 8 and thus replace 4 with 8.

You can also use compound literal syntax with char arrays and do

char *p = (char []) { "hello" };

In this case the right-hand side is a modifiable nameless object of type char [6].

share|improve this answer
    
note that compound literals is C99 –  newacct Jan 5 '13 at 5:10
    
@newacct: Yes, but I believe we are already well past the point when it has to be mentioned explicitly. –  AnT Jan 5 '13 at 7:14

The first thing you should do is read section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ.

The string literal "hello" is an expression of type char[6] (5 characters for "hello" plus one for the terminating '\0'). It refers to an anonymous array object with static storage duration, initialized at program startup to contain those 6 character values.

In most contexts, an expression of array type is implicitly converted a pointer to the first element of the array; the exceptions are:

  • When it's the argument of sizeof (sizeof "hello" yields 6, not the size of a pointer);
  • When it's the argument of _Alignof (a new feature in C11);
  • When it's the argument of unary & (&arr yields the address of the entire array, not of its first element; same memory location, different type); and
  • When it's a string literal in an initializer used to initialize an array object (char s[6] = "hello"; copies the whole array, not just a pointer).

None of these exceptions apply to your code:

char *ptr;
ptr = "hello";

So the expression "hello" is converted to ("decays" to) a pointer to the first element ('h') of that anonymous array object I mentioned above.

So *ptr == 'h', and you can advance ptr through memory to access the other characters: 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', and '\0'. This is what printf() does when you give it a "%s" format.

That anonymous array object, associated with the string literal, is read-only, but not const. What that means is that any attempt to modify that array, or any of its elements, has undefined behavior (because the standard explicitly says so) -- but the compiler won't necessarily warn you about it. (C++ makes string literals const; doing the same thing in C would have broken existing code that was written before const was added to the language.) So no, you can't modify the elements of "hello" -- or at least you shouldn't try. And to make the compiler warn you if you try, you should declare the pointer as const:

const char *ptr; /* pointer to const char, not const pointer to char */
ptr = "hello";

(gcc has an option, -Wwrite-strings, that causes it to treat string literals as const. This will cause it to warn about some C code that's legal as far as the standard is concerned, but such code should probably be modified to use const.)

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
   char * ptr;

   ptr = "hello"; 

  //instead of above tow lines you can write char *ptr = "hello" 

   printf("%p %s" ,"hello",ptr );

   getchar();

}

Here you have assigned string literal "hello" to ptr it means string literal is stored in read only memory so you can't modify it. If you declare char ptr[] = "hello";, then you can modify the array.

share|improve this answer

Say what?

Your code allocates 6 bytes of memory and initializes it with the values 'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', and '\0'.

It then allocates a pointer (number of bytes for the pointer depends on implementation) and sets the pointer's value to the start of the 5 bytes mentioned previously.

You can modify the values of an array using syntax such as ptr[1] = 'a'.

Syntactically, strings are a special case. Since C doesn't have a specific string type to speak of, it does offer some shortcuts to declaring them and such. But you can easily create the same type of structure as you did for a string using int, even if the syntax must be a bit different.

share|improve this answer
1  
ptr[1] = 'a'; may or may not execute and/or may or may not modify the value of 'e' to 'a' in the string. Most modern systems (Linux, MacOS X, Windows NT,2K,XP etc - not sure on Win98, etc) will fault when you do that, since it's "read only memory". –  Mats Petersson Jan 5 '13 at 2:04
    
Which is why I worded in the more generic term "modify the values of an array", so as to avoid questions about access, which is really a different issue altogether. –  Jonathan Wood Jan 5 '13 at 2:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.