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I have to sort output of a query for product names where the names have both alpha and numeric characters.

I have already found various solutions that convert the variables to numeric values (+0, etc.), and they sort the numeric part of the product names. But the preceding part of the product name string is of varying lengths, so the names aren't sorted alphabetically:

Post Lantern PL1
Post Lantern PL2
Post Lantern PL10
Post Lantern PL22

Landscape Light LV1
Landscape Light LV2
Landscape Light LV10
Landscape Light LV11

I guess the shorter names are sorted first?

I want the results sorted naturally: alphabetically, with the numbers in a natural order as well. I have tried:

ORDER by CAST(`product_name` AS DECIMAL), product_name
...
ORDER by product_name+0

The shorter names get sorted first, even though they are later in the alphabet. The numbers in the last part need to be in numerical order.

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2  
You need to ask a specific question. You haven't shown any queries, or listed what you've tried, or how you want them to be sorted. –  StilesCrisis Jan 5 '13 at 1:35
    
@David the miminum would be to state your table schema, sample data, and expected output ;) both alpha and numerics = alphanumerics –  bonCodigo Jan 5 '13 at 1:49
    
Do you have server-side? –  user1382306 Jan 5 '13 at 4:10

1 Answer 1

Here's a long query doing what you're looking for. I'm not sure about performance, though. You might also want to make some tests on several records to make sure.

SELECT
    *
    ,SUBSTRING(
        REVERSE(CAST(REVERSE(CONCAT(`product_name`,'8')) AS UNSIGNED)),1,
        CHARACTER_LENGTH(
            REVERSE(CAST(REVERSE(CONCAT(`product_name`,'8')) AS UNSIGNED))
        )-1
    ) AS 'numericVal'
FROM `some_table`
ORDER BY
    SUBSTRING(`product_name`,1,CHAR_LENGTH(`product_name`)-CHAR_LENGTH(`numericVal`)),
    CAST(`numericVal` AS UNSIGNED INTEGER)

The 8's in the CONCAT() functions are there for numbers that end with zero(s). Otherwise when you reverse e.g. the string "etc30" and parse the number there it will be 3, not 03. So reversing it back will again produce 3 instead of 30.

You can change those two 8's in the CONCAT() functions with any single digit(s) (except zeros) you like.

[EDIT 2]

Here's the breakdown.

# Example record "Post Lantern PL10"...
SELECT
    *
    ,SUBSTRING(                                         # 5a) substring of this is calculated
        REVERSE(                                        # 4) gets re-reversed into "108"
            CAST(                                       # 3) gets casted into an integer so "801" part is parsed
                REVERSE(                                # 2) gets reversed: "801LP nretnaL tsoP"
                    CONCAT(`product_name`,'8')          # 1) is concatenated with an 8: "Post Lantern PL108"
                )
            AS UNSIGNED)
        ),
        1,                                              # 5b) from the first character (index is 1 for this in SQL)
        CHARACTER_LENGTH(                               # 5c) and the length is recalculated (steps 1-4 repeated)
            REVERSE(
                CAST(
                    REVERSE(
                        CONCAT(`product_name`,'8')
                    )
                AS UNSIGNED)
            )
        )-1                                             # 5d1) minus 1 because at the beginning we appended an 8 and we
                                                        # 5d2) want to get rid of it now, so we're dropping the last digit
    ) AS 'numericVal'
FROM `some_table`
ORDER BY                                                        # 6) order by
    SUBSTRING(`product_name`,                                   # 7a) first, substring `product_name`
        1,                                                      # 7b) from the first character
        CHAR_LENGTH(`product_name`)-CHAR_LENGTH(`numericVal`)   # 7c) with the total length - length of numeric part
    ),
    CAST(`numericVal` AS UNSIGNED INTEGER)                      # 8a) then, by the numeric part, which gets casted into
                                                                # 8b) an integer for accurate numeric ordering

[EDIT 1]

I think the best shot you have (to have total control over the varying data) is to separate product_name into 3 columns - product_name (like "Landscape Light"), product_class (or whatever, like "LV") and product_version (the numeric part).

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I will try the above solution. I'm not where I can access the site now, but I think the following solution worked earlier. I didn't have time to check thoroughly: mysql> select f from f order by LEFT(f,1) < 'A', f; +------+ | f | +------+ | a0 | | abcd | | 012 | | 02x | | 0a | | 3A | +------+ 6 rows in set (0.00 sec) That was solution was here: codingforums.com/archive/index.php/t-240945.html –  David Barrow Jan 5 '13 at 5:50
    
@DavidBarrow I don't think that's reliable at all. LEFT(col,1) there will put "etc2" after "etc10", where 2 !> 10 in fact. I also edited my answer. –  inhan Jan 5 '13 at 15:25
    
Thanks. I will try that. –  David Barrow Jan 5 '13 at 21:37
    
inhan, I think that worked perfectly. I don't completely understand how it works, since I am a relative beginner. I guess I can go through the terms one by one. If you ever have time to summarize what that code is doing, I sure would appreciate it. The product names have already been established. To chop them into parts would be cumbersome for data entry later, so I am stuck with the solution above that works with the product names as they are. –  David Barrow Jan 9 '13 at 21:06
    
@DavidBarrow I added explanations to the whole code. Hope that makes sense. Let me know if I missed anything there. Still, I can't guarantee anything related to performance here since the engine has some string processing to do and the speed probably depends on the record quantity in this case. –  inhan Jan 10 '13 at 0:58

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