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Consider the following:

>>> a = {}
>>> b = {}
>>> c = {}
>>> c['a'] = 'b'
>>> a
{}
>>> b
{}
>>> c
{'a': 'b'}

OK, this is all well and good. Exactly what I expect. So then I shorten it.

>>> a = b = c = {}
>>> c['a'] = 'b'
>>> a
{'a': 'b'}
>>> b
{'a': 'b'}
>>> c
{'a': 'b'}

What's going on? This doesn't happen with other immutable data types, like integers.

>>> a = b = c = 0
>>> a += 1
>>> a
1
>>> b
0
>>> c
0

I think it might have to do with immutability, but this behavior is very strange to me. Can anyone shed some light on why it happens?

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1  
Just to be clear, dictionaries are mutable. (Your title makes it sound like you think otherwise.) –  senderle Jan 5 '13 at 2:15
    
Sorry, that was an error on my behalf. I changed the title. –  8chan Jan 5 '13 at 2:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What's going on? This doesn't happen with other immutable data types, like integers.

You hit it on the head. Immutable data types (integers, strings etc) don't behave this way while mutable data types (lists, dictionaries etc) do.

When you do a = b = c = 0 all three names point to the same memory. As integers are immutable, when you change the value of one it has to create a new integer object in new memory while the others stay pointing to the old object. Mutable objects are modified in place, so all names still point to the same (modified) object.

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Its the same as doing

a = []
b = a
b.append(1)
print a

When you type

a = {}
b = {}
c = {}

you are creating three seperate dicts,

a = b = c = {}

is one dict with three 'names'

Because ints (and other types) are immutable, they need new instances in memory. e.g. if you do

a = b = c = 0
b += 1
print id(b)
print id(c)
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I'm not sure if that's correct, I observed the behavior with integers with another immutable type (strings) as well. a=b="ab"; a="ba"; print(a,b) –  8chan Jan 5 '13 at 2:08
    
with immutable items, when you modify them, it actually gives a new item, while mutables change in place. –  Snakes and Coffee Jan 5 '13 at 3:24

You could try this:

a,b,c = [{}]*3   # <-- WRONG!

Edit:

a,b,c = ({} for i in range(3))  # <-- RIGHT!
share|improve this answer
    
Ha, that's cool looking :) Probably not as efficient, though. –  8chan Jan 5 '13 at 2:56
    
No, I fell victim to one of the classic blunders - see edited version. –  Paul McGuire Jan 5 '13 at 3:10

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