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I was trying to make a function that took a paragraph and displays the first letters of each word. The program runs fine the first few times I run it, but in subsequent instances, stops working after the function executes. Here is the code:

//program that returns the first letter of each word in a paragraph
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

void firstLetter(string, ostream&);

int main()
{
    string paragraph;

    cout<<"Enter a paragraph."<<endl;
    getline(cin, paragraph);

    firstLetter(paragraph, cout);

    return 0;
}

void firstLetter(string words, ostream& out)
{
    for(int i= 0; i < words.length(); i++){
        out<<words[i++]<<" ";

        while(words[i] != ' '){
            i++;
        }
    }
}

I've tried deleting the .exe file and rebuilding the project, but it just ends up not working again after a few runs. Any idea why this is happening?

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closed as too localized by Raymond Chen, jogojapan, Thomas Matthews, brian d foy, valex Jan 5 '13 at 6:44

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Follow what the program does with a debugger and the answer should become clear as day. –  chris Jan 5 '13 at 2:12
2  
Stack Overflow is not a human debugger. –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 2:13
    
@leemes SO is no human either. –  Mark Garcia Jan 5 '13 at 2:15
    
@MarkGarcia You're right. I should have said: ... a human-driven debugger. ;) –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 2:18
2  
The title of this question is unlikely to be useful to future visitors of the site. Too localized. –  Raymond Chen Jan 5 '13 at 3:58

4 Answers 4

The loop is the problem.

for(int i= 0; i < words.length(); i++){
    out<<words[i++]<<" ";

    while(words[i] != ' '){
        i++;
    }
}

You increment i in the increment expression (i++), but you also increment it in the out <<... expression. Your while loop can access invalid data here, as you are incrementing again after your previous check in the for-loop, as well as for every skipped letter. So sooner or later, you are accessing invalid data here, resulting in undefined behavior, or even a segmentation fault.

I expect you want to skip over non-spaces only if you didn't just output/skip the very last character (which is the case for the last word). This requires another check in the while loop:

    while(i < words.length() && words[i] != ' '){
        i++;
    }

There still is a problem with things like multiple spaces, dashes (if you don't want to output it) and other fancy typographical stuff... But I expect you don't need to consider these cases.

share|improve this answer
    
See my edit, it now corresponds to your problem (I first thought you want to skip multiple whitespaces...) –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 2:23
1  
"One of them shouldn't increment" - that's not really the case here is it? –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 2:35
    
@Fraser Yeah, it's a remaining from my previous answer, when I misinterpreted the question. Thanks for this hint, gonna remove this line. –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 2:43

You need to check that i has not exceeded the size of words in the while loop.

while(i < words.length() && words[i] != ' '){
    i++;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't you want to assert that i < words.length() before accessing words[i] since i is increment elsewhere within the loop? –  Johnsyweb Jan 5 '13 at 2:34
1  
Yes - corrected now thanks. –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 2:34
    
This means i < words.length() is checked twice –  StackHeapCollision Jan 5 '13 at 2:37
    
Well, it's checked every time the while loop cycles, which will be a lot more than before for a paragraph of more than 2 letters. –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 2:43
    
Ah, that helped. thanks! –  user1949498 Jan 5 '13 at 2:53

Agree with leemes. Think you have 'hello, world' the print should be 'h w', then error. because there's no ' ' after 'world', causing the while loop never end (and get to somewhere invalid), instead, you have a '\0'. I suggest you check the '\0' and return your function. like :

while(words[i] != ' ' && words[i] != '\0') 
{
i++;
}

(And I guess the fine cases you met should be those having a space in the end.)

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2  
A std::string doesn't have a \0 in its internal data, at least an implementation doesn't have to. Accessing words[words.length()] (which would be the case here) is undefined behavior. For C-strings, your code is the perfect solution. –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 2:30

Problem is that the inner loop is endless when i exceeds the bounds of the string.

  void firstLetter(string words, ostream& out)
    {
        for(size_t i= 0, len = words.length(); ; i++){  // i < words.length() removed, it is checked in the inner loop
            out<<words[i]<<" ";

            while(words[i] != ' '){
                if( i == len-1 ) return;
                i++;
            }
        }
    }

Here is an alternative I personaly would prefer to use:

#include <sstream>

    void firstLetter2(string words, ostream& out)
    {
        istringstream iss(words);

        while( ! iss.eof() )
        {
            string sWord;
            iss >> sWord >> ws;
            out<<sWord[0]<<' ';
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You fell into the same trap I did :-) You probably want to move your if to after your post-increment in the while loop to avoid accessing one-past-the-end. –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 2:47
    
@Fraser - No, it shouldn't matter because 'i' will never point at ' ' when at the end of the string, it will perform one more iteration before returning –  StackHeapCollision Jan 5 '13 at 2:52
    
So say words.size() is 8, and on entering the while loop, i is 7. You increment and then access words[8], which is past the end. Also, if words ends in a space, by removing the check in the for, you access two-past-the-end in the while loop. –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 3:02
    
@Fraser - Yes and a slight change fixes it, thanks. I made an edit. –  StackHeapCollision Jan 5 '13 at 3:13
    
You still have a problem if words ends in ' '. –  Fraser Jan 5 '13 at 3:17

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