Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make some code more readable. For Example foreach(var row in table) {...} rather than foreach(DataRow row in table.Rows) {...}.

To do this I created an extension method:

namespace System.Data {
    public static class MyExtensions {
        public static IEnumerable<DataRow> GetEnumerator( this DataTable tbl ) {
            foreach ( DataRow r in tbl.Rows ) yield return r;
        }
    }
}

But the compiler still throws foreach statement cannot operate on variables of type 'System.Data.DataTable' because 'System.Data.DataTable' does not contain a public definition for 'GetEnumerator'.

To confirm that I implemented the extension method appropriately I tried the following code instead and the compiler had no problem with it.

for ( IEnumerator<DataRow> enm = data.GetEnumerator(); enm.MoveNext(); ) {
    var row = enm.Current;
    ...
}

Before you say that it is because IEnumerator or IEnumerator<DataRow> is not implemented, consider that the following does compile:

public class test {
    public void testMethod() {
        foreach ( var i in new MyList( 1, 'a', this ) ) { }
    }
}
public class MyList {
    private object[] _list;
    public MyList( params object[] list ) { _list = list; }
    public IEnumerator<object> GetEnumerator() { foreach ( var o in _list ) yield return o; }
}
share|improve this question
2  
It seems to me that the error message says it all. You need to implement this on the class, not as an extension. –  spender Jan 5 '13 at 3:07
1  
I'm confused.. that cannot be the actual code. fordoes not work on enumerator. And test isn't an Enumerable. Paste the actual code. –  Lews Therin Jan 5 '13 at 3:07
5  
Very subjective note: Making code that looks common (like var row in table.Rows) across large number of source files and samples into code that you feel right now to be nicer is not necessary the best way of making code more readable. Foreach often can be transformed to LINQ statement that is more compact and common enough for people not to question what is happening. Imagine posting your foreach(var row in table) in next question on SO - noone will be able to reason about that code without larger sample that includes your magic extensions. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 5 '13 at 3:26
3  
@LewsTherin, by default, for does not; however, because he is using it with GetEnumerator() it is indeed valid. Not necessarily the most readable, but valid. Also, foreach can iterate over any class with a GetEmumerator() method with returns an IEnumerator. I'm pretty sure that is the actual code. –  Steve Konves Jan 5 '13 at 3:26
    
@SteveKonves I failed to see the semicolons xD... Oh yeah That's a new one for me. I thought one had to implement IEnumerator –  Lews Therin Jan 5 '13 at 3:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

There is plenty of confusion in the other answers so far. (Though Preston Guillot's answer is pretty good, it does not actually put a finger on what's going on here.) Let me try to clarify.

First off, you are simply out of luck. C# requires that the collection used in a foreach statement either:

  1. Implement a public GetEnumerator that matches the required pattern.
  2. Implement IEnumerable (and of course, IEnumerable<T> requires IEnumerable)
  3. Be dynamic, in which case we simply kick the can down the road and do the analysis at runtime.

The upshot is that the collection type must actually implement the GetEnumerator one way or the other. Providing an extension method does not cut it.

This is unfortunate. In my opinion, when the C# team added extension methods to C# 3 they should have modified existing features such as foreach (and perhaps even using!) to consider extension methods. However, the schedule was extremely tight during the C# 3 release cycle and any extra work items that did not get LINQ implemented on time were likely to be cut. I do not recall precisely what the design team said on this point and I don't have my notes anymore.

This unfortunate situation is the result of the fact that languages grow and evolve; old versions are designed for the needs of their time, and new versions have to build on that foundation. If, counterfactually, C# 1.0 had had extension methods and generics then the foreach loop could have been designed like LINQ: as a simple syntactic transformation. But it was not, and now we are stuck with the legacy of pre-generic, pre-extension-method design.

Second, there seems to be some misinformation in other answers and comments about what precisely is required to make foreach work. You are not required to implement IEnumerable. For more details on this commonly misunderstood feature, see my article on the subject.

Third, there seems to be some question as to whether this behaviour is actually justified by the specification. It is. The specification does not explicitly call out that extension methods are not considered in this case, which is unfortunate. However, the specification is extremely clear on what happens:

The compiler begins by doing a member lookup for GetEnumerator. The member lookup algorithm is documented in detail in section 7.3, and member lookup does not consider extension methods, only actual members. Extension methods are only considered after regular overload resolution has failed, and we haven't gotten to overload resolution yet. (And yes, extension methods are considered by member access, but member access and member lookup are different operations.)

If member lookup fails to find a method group then the attempt to match the pattern fails. The compiler therefore never goes on to the overload resolution portion of the algorithm, and therefore never has a chance to consider extension methods.

Therefore the behaviour you describe is consistent with the specified behaviour.

I advise you to read section 8.8.4 of the specification very carefully if you want to understand precisely how a compiler analyzes a foreach statement.

Fourth, I encourage you to spend your time adding value to your program in some other way. The compelling benefit of

foreach (var row in table)

over

foreach(var row in table.Rows)

is tiny for the developer and invisible to the customer. Spend your time adding new features or fixing bugs or analyzing performance, rather than making already perfectly clear code five characters shorter.

share|improve this answer

The GetEnumerator method in your test class is not static, the extension method is. This doesn't compile either:

class test
{
}

static class x
{
    public static IEnumerator<object> GetEnumerator(this test t) { return null; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        foreach (var i in new test()) {  }
    }
}

In order for the foreach syntax sugar to work your class must expose a public GetEnumerator instance method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. @jshall, The behavior of picking instance method for iteration is specified in the "8.8.4 The foreach statement" section of "CSharp Language Specification" for C# 4.0. If you read it carefully there is no mentioning of extension methods in search for "GetEnumerator". –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 5 '13 at 4:14
    
-1 Extension methods are suppose to be static (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb311042.aspx ). Also Extension methods enable you to "add" methods to existing types without creating a new derived type, recompiling, or otherwise modifying the original type. (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb383977.aspx) –  Trisped Jan 5 '13 at 4:38
    
Of course extension methods are static. That's the point, GetEnumerator can't be static. –  Preston Guillot Jan 5 '13 at 4:46
    
I think Alexei is on to something. What I am unsure of is whether checking for GetEnumerator as an extension method is an intentional omission or an oversight. All the documentation I've read implies that it should work, but the compiler seems reflect the specification's omission. –  jshall Jan 5 '13 at 5:56
1  
"Perform overload resolution using the resulting method group and an empty argument list. If overload resolution results in no applicable methods, results in an ambiguity, or results in a single best method but that method is either static or not public, check for an enumerable interface as described below." The spec calls out static implementations of GetEnumerator, and extension methods are static. –  Preston Guillot Jan 5 '13 at 5:59

some offtopic: if you want to do it more readable write

foreach ( DataRow r in tbl.Rows ) yield return r;

as

foreach (DataRow row in tbl.Rows) 
{
    yield return row;
}

now to your problem.. try this

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetEnumerator<T>(this DataTable table)
    {
        return table.Rows.Cast<T>();
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
I would say your first point is a matter of opinion, not fact. –  Ed S. Jan 5 '13 at 3:22
    
There is no problem with the implementation of GetEnumerator, the compiler simply fails to find it. –  jshall Jan 5 '13 at 4:12
1  
@jshall, it does not "fail to find", it "must not find" extension method, - see my other comment on location of this requirement in the C# specification. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 5 '13 at 4:16

Your extension is equivalent to:

    public static IEnumerable<TDataRow> GetEnumerator<TDataRow>( this DataTable tbl ) {
        foreach ( TDataRow r in tbl.Rows ) yield return r;
    }

GetEnumerator<TDataRow> is not the same method as GetEnumerator

This will work better:

    public static IEnumerable<DataRow> GetEnumerator( this DataTable tbl ) {
        foreach (DataRow r in tbl.Rows ) yield return r;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
That may "work better" for resolving the var in foreach(var row in table) but it still does not compile. –  jshall Jan 5 '13 at 3:56

Within an foreach statement the compiler is looking for an instance method of GetEnumerator. Therefore the type (here DataTable) must implement IEnumerable. It will never find your extension method instead, because it is static. You have to write the name of your extension method in the foreach.

namespace System.Data {
    public static class MyExtensions {
        public static IEnumerable<DataRow> GetEnumerator( this DataTable table ) {
            foreach ( DataRow r in table.Rows ) yield return r;
        }
    }
}

foreach(DataRow row in table.GetEnumerator())
  .....

To avoid confusion, I would suggest using a different name for your extension method. Maybe something like GetRows()

share|improve this answer

The object collection in a foreach must implement System.Collections.IEnumerable or System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T>.

If you have a very strong desire to enable this then you could create a wrapper class which implements IEnumerable and has a pointer to you DataTable. Alternatively, you could inherit DataTable in a new class and implement IEnumerable.

Code readability is most often personal preference. I personally find your changes to the foreach statement less readable (but I am sure there are many on SO who agree with you).

share|improve this answer
    
See the end of the question, inheritance is not necessary and the last bit of code proves it. –  jshall Jan 5 '13 at 5:00
    
@jshall Seems you missed the links to the documentation in my answer. It is necessarily. Just because it compiles does not mean it is going to run, as you have already proven. If you are really that interested in using a DataTable as the object collection in a foreach statement then you will need to either use a wrapper class as I suggested or inherit DataTable in a new class which implements IEnumerable. –  Trisped Jan 5 '13 at 5:12
    
@jshall I guess I should add the reason your second example works is because the compiler adds the interface to the class for you. Since it is not compiling the DataTable class it can not add the interface in your problem. The other issue with your example is that it is not using an extension to add the method. I doubt that it would compile if you were. –  Trisped Jan 5 '13 at 5:15
2  
The documentation at your link is incomplete. The C# Language Spec clarifies that implementing IEnumerable or IEnumerable<T> is not necessary for foreach to function. In fact, the compiler looks for the interface implementation last, after checking if the type is an array, a dynamic, or provides a sufficient instance method named GetEnumerator. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228593.aspx see section 8.8.4 –  Preston Guillot Jan 5 '13 at 5:29
2  
Trisped: your analysis is incorrect. @PrestonGuillot's analysis is correct. –  Eric Lippert Jan 5 '13 at 14:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.