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the question is

Which of the following methods for providing explicit names for the columns in a view work?

a. Include a column list
b. Provide column aliases in the view SELECT statement
c. Rename the columns when you select from the view

answer

a. Works: Include a column list
b. Works: Provide column aliases in the view SELECT statement
c. Does not work: Rename the columns when you select from the view

regarding (c) what do they mean by "Rename the columns when you select from the view"?

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I cannot imagine what they mean here. Perhaps calling the columns by what you are wishing and hoping they would be? Running an ALTER VIEW statement prior to the column? I'm as curious as you are. –  Eric Sep 13 '09 at 4:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the question in the certification guide is worded poorly. You can give explicit names to columns when you select from a view, and this works:

CREATE VIEW MyView AS SELECT a, b, c FROM MyTable;
SELECT a AS d, b AS e, c AS f FROM MyView;

The problem is not with giving aliases to columns explicitly. Here's the problem: if you rely on this instead of defining the view with distinct column names, and the view consists of a join such that the column names are ambiguous, you run into trouble:

CREATE VIEW MyView AS 
  SELECT m.a, m.b, m.c, o.a, o.b, o.c 
  FROM MyTable m JOIN OtherTable o;

This is not a valid view, because in the view definition, all column names must be distinct. For instance, you would get ambiguous results when you query the view:

SELECT a FROM MyView;

Does this select the first a column or the second a column?

So you must have a distinct set of column names in the view definition, it's not enough to make them distinct as you query the view.

This is the reason I think the certification guide question was poorly worded. It's not about renaming columns explicitly, it's about ensuring that the columns of the view have distinct names. This is a common reason for renaming columns, so that's probably why the person writing the question wrote it that way.


Either of the other techniques mentioned in the question can resolve the ambiguity:

CREATE VIEW MyView (a, b, c, d, e, f) AS 
  SELECT m.a, m.b, m.c, o.a, o.b, o.c 
  FROM MyTable m JOIN OtherTable o;

or

CREATE VIEW MyView AS 
  SELECT m.a, m.b, m.c, o.a AS d, o.b AS e, o.c AS f 
  FROM MyTable m JOIN OtherTable o;

Either way, you get the aliased columns:

SELECT * FROM MyView; -- returns result with columns a, b, c, d, e, f
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By "rename when you select" they surely mean something like SELECT a AS b FROM theview etc. The reason it doesn't work for the given task of "providing explicit names for the columns" is that there need not be an explicit, unambigous a in the view for you to "rename"... UNLESS you've already disambiguated by methods (a) or (b) [[in which case you may also "rename" this way, but that's pretty much a secondary issue!-)]].

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i dont really get the part "is that there need not be an explicit, unambigous a in the view for you to "rename"... " is there a typo? –  iceangel89 Sep 13 '09 at 12:46
    
What I meant is: unless you do provide a column_list, or an as clause for every column in the CREATE VIEW ... SELECT, the names of the views' actual columns are not "explicit and unambiguous" (they're technically unambiguous because duplicates are not allowed, but not necessarily unambiguous to the reader). –  Alex Martelli Sep 13 '09 at 15:15
    
hmm ... so its like using SELECT a AS b FROM theview is NOT "providing explicit names for the VIEW'S columns" but the "result set"'s columns –  iceangel89 Sep 14 '09 at 3:36
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