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I'm fairly new to python (coding in general really), but I mostly grasp what's put in front of me. I'm trying to create an input that will only accept integers, so I put together the following function:

def askFor(request):
   """Program asks for input, continues to ask until an integer is given"""
   num = ' '
    while (isinstance(num, int) == False):
        num = input(request)
    else:
        return num

it works fine when i enter a number, but anything else breaks it instead of looping it back. Am I missing an element, or am I just best off to go with

str(input('wargharble: '))
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5  
Just a stylistic note: while not isinstance(num, int): is a little more Pythonic than while (isinstance(num, int) == False):. :) –  Pieter Witvoet Jan 5 '13 at 5:30
    
The problem is that in Python 2 input() runs eval() on whatever the user types in (see the docs), so if it's not valid Python syntax for a constant or literal expression, like 42, 1+2, or "Bob", an exception will be raised which your program will need to catch. I suggest you instead use num = int(raw_input(request)) within a try/except clause because it doesn't use eval() and is therefore safer. –  martineau Jan 5 '13 at 14:12

5 Answers 5

You are on the safer side with raw_input in Python 2, because it will always return a string, whereas input will try to evaluate the given string, which is dangerous.

def askFor(prompt):
    """ ask for input, continues to ask until an integer is given
    """
    number = None
    while True:
        try:
            number = int(raw_input(prompt))
            break
        except ValueError:
            pass # or display some hint ...
    print(number) # or return or what you need ...
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I was just in the middle of writing the exact same thing! But anyway, you might consider mentioning that in python 2 input evaluates the input as python code, while raw_input returns a string. –  Volatility Jan 5 '13 at 5:24
    
@Volatility, you might consider mentioning ...: my thought exactly :) –  miku Jan 5 '13 at 5:24
    
this didn't seem to work with the rest of the code that I had. Whenever I entered a non-integer, it would accept it, and not ask for the same data again, then break when it's line came up. –  DJ80 Jan 5 '13 at 5:58
    
@DJ80, the snippet works for me as it is posted here - it asks for input as long as the user does not input an int. –  miku Jan 5 '13 at 6:00
    
@Miku, I've copy/pasted your coding to a new file with the rest of my program, and it now functions as you said. I likely just missed something simple like changing input to raw_input. Now I just need to wrap my brain around what makes it work. –  DJ80 Jan 5 '13 at 6:16

The problem is that input() returns the raw user input evaluated as a python expression. So when you input something like "someinput" on the console here is what happens:

  1. The raw input is captured from the console as a string
  2. That string is then parsed as a python expression (so imagine you simply type this string into your program, in this case, it becomes a variable with the name "someinput"
  3. When isinstance() is called on this python expression, the python interpreter can't find a variable named "someinput" which is defined - so it throws an exception.

What you really want to do is use raw_input(), this will return a string representing the user's input. Since you are receiving a string from the console now though, you need some way of checking if a string is an int (because isinstance will always return a string)

Now to determine if the string is a number, you could use something like isdigit() - but be careful - this function will validate any string that contains only digits (so 0393 would be valid).

Here are the corrections that need to be made:

def askFor(request):
   """Program asks for input, continues to ask until an integer is given"""
   num = ' '
    while (num.isdigit() == False):
        num = raw_input(request)
    else:
        return num
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isdigit() wouldn't work for negative numbers. –  miku Jan 5 '13 at 5:31
    
Agreed, I defer to miku's solution for parsing the string as an integer –  Will C. Jan 5 '13 at 5:34

This is because input() is failing on non-integer input (this has to do with the fact that input() is calling eval() on the string your inputting (see python builtins).

raw_input() does not. (in fact, input() calls raw_input())

Try this instead:

while True:
    num = raw_input(request)
    if num.isdigit():
        break

The isdigit() function checks to see if each character in a string is a digit ('0' - '9')

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1  
This wouldn't work for negative numbers. –  DSM Jan 5 '13 at 5:28

input evaluates whatever's typed in as Python code, so if the user types something non-sensical in, it'll produce an error. Or worse, it can run arbitrary commands on your computer. Usually, you want to use raw_input and convert the string value it returns safely yourself. Here, you just need to call int on the string, which can still produce an error if the user enters a non-int, but we can handle that by looping.

And voila:

def read_int(request):
    while True:
        try:
            return int(raw_input(request))
        except ValueError:
            pass

Note, there's no need for break or else; just return the value once you have parsed it successfully!

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Well first off, your indentation if a bit off (the while loop's indentation level does not match the previous level).

def askFor(request):
    """Program asks for input, continues to ask until an integer is given"""
    num, isNum = '', False # multiple assignment
    while not isNum:
        num = input(request)
        if type(num) in (int, long): # if it is any of these
           isNum = True
           break  
        else: isNum = False
    return num # at the end of the loop, it will return the number, no need for an else

Another way to do it:

def askFor(request):
    """Program asks for input, continues to ask until an integer is given"""
    num, isNum = '', False
    while not isNum:
        num = raw_input(request)
        try: # try to convert it to an integer, unless there is an error
            num = int(num)
            isNum = True
            break
        except ValueError:
            isNum = False
    return num
share|improve this answer
    
-1: In you first snippet you use type, which is a kind of last resort, if nothing else works (see also: stackoverflow.com/a/1549854/89391); in your second example you introduce too much clutter. –  miku Jan 5 '13 at 5:46
    
The first way didn't work for me, but the second way seems to work perfectly. I see I need to read up more on try statements. Many thanks. –  DJ80 Jan 5 '13 at 5:59
    
Yeah the problem with the first one is that say the user enters 'two' for the input statement, two is used as a variable. As it is not defined, you will get a NameError. You could use try and except with that as well, or use raw_input; raw_input returns the user's input as a string, so then you can use a try to convert it to an integer, unless there is an error (most likely TypeError); then prompt them again. –  Rushy Panchal Jan 6 '13 at 18:57

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