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I'm using Oracle 11g, the main table has about 10m records. Here is my query:

SELECT COUNT (*)
  FROM CONTACT c INNER JOIN STATUS S ON C.STATUS = S.STATUS
 WHERE C.USER = 1 AND S.REQUIRE = 1 AND ROWNUM = 1;

The Cost is 3736, but when I changed it to this form:

SELECT COUNT (*) FROM
  (SELECT 1 FROM CONTACT c INNER JOIN STATUS S ON C.STATUS = S.STATUS
  WHERE C.USER = 1 AND S.REQUIRE = 1 AND ROWNUM = 1);

The Cost became 5! What's the difference between these 2 queries?

Here are the explain plan for both query:

The first query:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                      | Name                    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT               |                         |     1 |    10 |  3736   (1)| 00:00:45 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE                |                         |     1 |    10 |            |          |
|*  2 |   COUNT STOPKEY                |                         |       |       |            |          |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS                |                         |  4627 | 46270 |  3736   (1)| 00:00:45 |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CONTACT                 |  6610 | 33050 |  3736   (1)| 00:00:45 |
|*  5 |      INDEX RANGE SCAN          | IX_CONTACT_USR          |  6610 |       |    20   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |     INDEX RANGE SCAN           | IX_CONTACT_STATUS       |     1 |     5 |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - filter(ROWNUM=1)
   5 - access("C"."USER"=1)
   6 - access("C"."STATUS"="S"."STATUS" AND "S"."REQUIRE"=1)

The second query:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                       | Name                    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                |                         |     1 |       |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE                 |                         |     1 |       |            |          |
|   2 |   VIEW                          |                         |     1 |       |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    COUNT STOPKEY                |                         |       |       |            |          |
|   4 |     NESTED LOOPS                |                         |     2 |    20 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   5 |      TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CONTACT                 |     3 |    15 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |       INDEX RANGE SCAN          | IX_CONTACT_USR          |  6610 |       |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  7 |      INDEX RANGE SCAN           | IX_CONTACT_STATUS       |     1 |     5 |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   3 - filter(ROWNUM=1)
   6 - access("C"."USER"=1)
   7 - access("C"."STATUS"="S"."STATUS" AND "S"."REQUIRE"=1)

I executed 2 queries, the first one sometimes cost 45s+ (e.g. first run or change the user id), otherwise it will cost <1s. I totally don't know why it's such different, maybe db cache?

When I executed the second query, I can always get result in 1s. So I think the second one is better, but I don't the reason why it improves a lot.

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can you post explain plan for both the queries it will help us better understand the table statistics and compare the two queries. For getting explain plan of query follow this link: oraclebin.com/2012/12/… –  Sushant Butta Jan 5 '13 at 6:47
    
Comment on explain plan provided: As I supposed, your two querries will not be different. Only difference is line 2 - and that won't affect performance... (notice also that explain plan is not always what you will get in runtime - that's why I proposed to trace it. –  igr Jan 5 '13 at 8:01
    
Nice question and definitely going to get different answers! I'm glad you put in the plans not many do and it's frustrating, plus 1 just for that! –  glh Jan 5 '13 at 11:24
    
Are you saying they actually run in different amounts of time, or just that the explain plan says they will run in a different amount of time? I'd be surprised if the estimate said 45 seconds and the execution time was actually 45 seconds. If you're worried about caching, try running 'alter system flush buffer_cache;' before each statement and re-testing. (But keep in mind that you don't always want to test your server "cold".) –  Jon Heller Jan 5 '13 at 16:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can see where the difference comes in by comparing the line in the execution plans that access the CONTACT table (looks at the rows column, the first one).

First:

|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CONTACT                 |  6610 | 33050 |  3736   (1)| 00:00:45 |

Second:

|   5 |      TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CONTACT                 |     3 |    15 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |

In the first example, the ROWNUM = 1 predicate isn't applied until after the CONTACT table has been accessed, so you're getting 6610 rows returned from this table. Whereas in your second query optimizer has only returned 3. This is many orders of magnitude less, which is why you're seeing the second query complete quicker.

As to why the second execution of the "slow" query is "fast", you're thinking is correct - the data has been loaded from disk into the buffer cache so access is much quicker.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe that is only showing how the optimizer's estimate changes. The Predicate Information section implies that filter(ROWNUM=1) is applied after both tables, in both cases. –  Jon Heller Jan 5 '13 at 16:28
    
You're right, it is applying the filter in both cases and that the explain plan is just an estimate. To be certain we'd need to see the output from an SQL trace, but the poster's empirical tests appear to confirm what's show in the plan: that the first query is accessing more rows from the CONTACT table that the second is. –  Chris Saxon Jan 5 '13 at 16:53
2  
I've run some tests and the explain plans match up with what's shown in the question, but the tkprof results show that it's always accessing just one row from both tables in both queries. So it's likely that the effect is entirely down to caching and there's (effectively) no difference between the queries –  Chris Saxon Jan 5 '13 at 17:25
1  
Part "This is many orders of magnitude less, which is why you're seeing the second query complete quicker." is misleading, filters are applied in same steps (taking into account increment by one) –  igr Jan 6 '13 at 12:50

Most likely that's just estimation difference and they will have same execution statistics. Trace both + tkprof to get real data. Also if you want some more details behind optimizer logic - do hard parse with event 10053.

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Cost is not only the factor for the queries, some times it depends on the server also, which u r showing is it a CPU cost or I/O Cost, some times cost my vary, because of the Column Cardinality, Conditions of the query. if u wanna see the much clarification on the queries, get the explain plan or TKPROOF, so that u 'll get to know , it's going for full table scan or which index is picking up and execution time.

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