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I am currently trying to create a system in which I want to be able to assign unique family ID's to classes at runtime. Essentially I want to be able to distinguish between classes based on a integer-value after having them registered at runtime.

The use-case for this is that this system will be used as the bureaucrazy for a component system. All classes are descendant (not necessarily direct) from a class Component; and are registered at runtime.

I want to be able to do this for several reasons:

  • Eaze and safety of extension: People will not have to modify a gigantic list in the base component system to add Components.
  • Efficiency: Lookup internally is done using this integer value so can be O(1) instead of a search lookup. As these components will makeup the bulk of the system, I prefer not to make it an instance variable. I cannot ignore this aspect as testcases have already shown that I cannot afford > O(1) removal and insertion. (A first implementation used map lookup tables)

I am looking for a compile-time checked implementation; not a contract based solution. A contract based solution in Java would be:

interface Component {

   // Should return the value of a static variable
   int getFamilyID();
   int setFamilyID(int id);
}

class Foo implements Component {

   static int familyID = 0;

   int getFamilyID(){ return familyID; }
   int setFamilyID(int id){ familyID = id; }
}

class System {  // Singleton
   static int registeredComponents = 0;
   void register(Component c){ c.setFamilyID(registeredComponents++); }   
}

This obviously doesn't work for two reasons:

  • I can't specify A.getFamilyID() unless I make the variable public; usecase: c.getFamilyID() == Foo.getFamilyID(); (instead of instanceof)
  • Redundant code all over the place; each implementation of Component would need to have the copy-pasted implementation.

I thought that I could solve the issue in C++ with a template that specified a static variable, but this becomes unusable when the class is not a direct descendant of Component.

I can also not use enums within Java as they are language-specific and the amount of components would make the code for a single file humongous. (also; they would all have to be specified in a single place again)

Any help in this matter or insight in why I'm trying to "do the wrong thing"(TM) would be quite helpfull :-)

Edit: To clarify, I want some way to ensure at compile-time the code convention of a static integer which can be set in the component class.

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1  
"Language-specific"? So are templates, generics, interfaces, etc. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 5 '13 at 10:36
1  
When you say "compile-time checked", what exactly would you like to be checked? Can you give an example of the code you'd like to be able to write? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 5 '13 at 10:39
    
Either you register component classes and the family ID should be static (but why not use the class name as an identifier then), or you register component instances and the family ID can be an inherited property, implemented as an instance field. –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '13 at 10:39
    
I wonder if "bureaucrazy" is a typo or a pun –  Kos Jan 5 '13 at 11:06
    
@Kos Maybe a Freudian slip:-). (But the presence of "eaze" for "ease" makes me think that the author may not be a native speaker, and that in his native language, a "z" would normally be used for this sound. Although I'm not sure. I've seen some pretty weird spelling errors from native speakers, including myself.) –  James Kanze Jan 5 '13 at 11:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In C++ you can use the curiously recurring template pattern in order to avoid code repetition.

class Component 
{
public:
    virtual ~Component() {}
    virtual int getFamilyId() const = 0;
};

// each instance is assigned a unique int at construction
class FamilyId 
{ 
    static int numberOfExistingIds = 0;
    int id;
public:
    FamilyId() : id( numberOfExistingIds++ ) {}
    int getId() const { return id; }
};

// implementation is done only in this template class
template <typename Derived, typename Base = Component> 
class ComponentImpl : public Base 
{
    static FamilyId familyId; // one instance per class for unique id
public:
    virtual int getFamilyId() const 
    { 
        assert( typeid(*this) == typeid(Derived) ); 
        return familyId.getId(); 
    }
};

Having set this up, you can easily create new classes in your Component class hierarchy.

// first derived class, automagically implemented by template magic
class MyGeneralComponent 
    : public ComponentImpl<MyGeneralComponent> 
{
     /* add new methods here */ 
};

// class further down in the hierarchy are also possible, 
// by using the second template argument. The implementation still works. 
class MySpecificComponent 
    : public ComponentImpl<MySpecificComponent,MyGeneralComponent> 
{
     /* add new methods here */ 
};

The assert(...) will automatically check at run-time, if you correctly derived from the template. So you will uncover bugs like

class MySpecificComponent : MyGeneralComponent 
{
};

at run-time. This derived class would otherwise use the same interface implementation as the direct base and use the same static variable, which would be a bug.

You might have noticed that you don't need to register any classes by hand. This is done via dynamic initialization of static variables before the main() function starts. So you don't need to do anything about that. In this way you can easily implement your classes in one spot, without changing other files and without lots of code repetition - open/closed principle par excellence.

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This is the solution to the problem I was running into C++! Sadly, I don't see a way this would work in Java. –  Methius Jan 5 '13 at 18:04

What you're basically asking for is that a specific runtime behavior be checked at compile time. In the general case, that is simply impossible: you can write all the functions you want, but the compiler will never be able to ensure that you call a given function once, and only once, for each type. The best you can do is use some sort of static variable, make the function private, and put the call to the registration in the constructor:

class Component
{
protected:
    class Registrator
    {
        static int nextId;
        int id;
    public:
        Registrator() ; id( nextId ++ ) {}
        int id() const { return id; }
    };
    //  ...
};

class Derived ; public Component
{
    static Registrator ourId;
    //  ...
};

(You can do this in Java as well. Just put static Registrator ourId = new Registrator(); in a static block in each derived class.)

You still have to require (by contract) that each derived class contain one, and only one static member of type Registrator. Off hand, I don't think that you can avoid this.

Note that in general, anytime you have a base class and derived classes, you'll need to count on contracts. If the base class has a virtual function clone for example (with the usual semantics), every derived class must implement it. There's no way of enforcing this sort of thing at compile time; some of the programming by contract idioms will allow enforcing at runtime that the dynamic type of object clone returns is correct, but there's no way you can enforce, even at runtime, that the returned object is an actual copy, and not some totally unrelated instance.

To which all I can say is that I've never found this to be a problem in practice. Anyone deriving from Component (or any other base class) must know the contract promessed by Component. You can (and should) verify some things, but in the end, you can't verify everything, and in practice, someone who derives, ignoring the contract, will create code which doesn't work, and there's not much you can do about it. (Code review goes a long way here. Particularly code review that also includes test coverage, insisting that all of the contract issues are tested)

EDIT:

One final comment: I would argue against using an int for the identifier. If performance in comparing identifiers is important, you can still use a char const[]; if you guarantee that all correctly obtained identifiers point (since the actual identifier you use will be a char const*) to the same string, you can just compare pointers. The contract for the derived class is then:

class Derived : public Component
{
public:
    static char const* className() { return "Derived"; }
    //  overriding virtual function in Component...
    char const* type() const { return className(); }
    //  ...
};

Then, just use the char const* returned by className or type as your identifier.

That's a bit more for the author of the derived class to type, but at least in C++, there are always macros to simplify it. In fact, I would recommend a macro for this sort of thing, even with the original solution above. If the derived classes all use a macro, you can change the strategy without changing anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
The identifier is primarily used internally to insert/remove the correct instance of the Component in a array lookup table. Also; my main emphasis is how to enforce through code a particular recurring static construct. However thank you for providing an alternative (and correct) insight into my problem! :-) –  Methius Jan 5 '13 at 17:59

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