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I'm using boost and would like if this:

// --- some random function ---
boost::asio::io_service io;
boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket sock;
char b[256];
// connect and stuff here
boost::asio::async_read( sock,
    boost::asio::buffer(b, 256),
    boost::bind( &onRead, _1, _2)
    );

is the same of

// --- some random function ---
boost::asio::io_service io;
boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket sock;
boost::thread *read_thread;
char b[256];
// connect and stuff here
read_thread = new boost::thread( 
    boost::bind( &boost::asio::io_service::run, &( io))
    );
io.post( &read, b, sock);


// --- read function
bool read( char b[], boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket sock){
    boost::asio::read( sock,
        boost::asio::buffer(b, 256),
        boost::bind( &onRead, _1, _2)
        );
}

I just would like what happens in an async call and what it differs from a sync.

Edited: My main question is: the async call blocks the thread binded with the io_service?

Edited 2: This solved my issues: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-async/?ca=dgr-lnxw02aUsingPOISIXAIOAPI

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A synchronous call returns when it has performed its work, and the result of the work is available in the next statement. Such a call may very well block.

An asynchronous call returns immediately, but the state of the work is indeterminate. When the work is done, the registered call-back function is called by the ioservice, and since you're running that service in a separate thread, the call-back runs in that separate thread, too.

Asynchronous programming is much harder in terms of the control flow, but it is vastly superior in terms of performance. If the reads and writes are part of the ongoing operation of the server, then you're almost always better off with an asynchronous model (though this may well be single-threaded, just not with Boost). Simple tools that run once and do a bunch of things in a sequence, on the other hand, may just use synchronous calls, which is simpler to write and understand and might not make a difference if you need to wait for the result of the operations anyway.

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But, the async call blocks the thread binded with the referent io_service? – lucastamoios Jan 5 '13 at 12:00
1  
@lucastamoios: No, it doesn't. The ioservice itself implements single-threaded asynchronous operations and a polling loop. Only when an operation has finished does the call-back execute, non-blockingly but sequentially in the ioservice thread. – Kerrek SB Jan 5 '13 at 13:02
    
so, there is a invisible thread in my application??? It was what I wanted to know. Thanks. – lucastamoios Jan 5 '13 at 13:07
    
@lucastamoios: No, the thread is not invisible. It's right there in your code! The call-backs are run from the run() function of the ioservice. – Kerrek SB Jan 5 '13 at 13:45
1  
@lucastamoios: The read is asynchronous, so the async_read function returns immediately. Asynchronous I/O is an operating system feature, and there is no user code involved in actually reading bytes from the device. Just think of an epoll event loop (which is what Boost.Asio is). – Kerrek SB Jan 5 '13 at 14:33

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