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  bool isValidId(int* id)
  {
        if(log10(*id) != 6)
        {
           return false;
        }

   return true;
  }


  printf("Enter ID: ");
  gets(input);
  c.id = atoi(input);
  validID= isValidId(c.id);
  if(!validID)
  {
     printf("Invalid ID format -(Use example 123456 format). \n");
  }

This is how it looks now.I ask the user to enter an ID and check it if is valid with the isValidId method but my program is crashing when I enter an ID. Please help! Thanks

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6  
log10 is good for that. –  chris Jan 5 '13 at 11:51
    
You can keep dividing by 10 to do the logarithm manually... that's actually not as slow as it sounds, but it can be optimized further if performance is critical. –  Kerrek SB Jan 5 '13 at 11:52
    
In case you're wondering, Kerrek is probably talking about the function described in vimeo.com/55639112 (around 30m). –  Zeta Jan 5 '13 at 11:53
    
how can that be done in this method? :S I never heard of it –  user1930901 Jan 5 '13 at 11:55
    
@Zeta: I have no idea, since I can't read a video link, but you can do things like dividing by higher powers of 10 to eat up large chunks of the number in one go. Facebook's Folly library does something related for string formatting (i.e. format two decimal digits at a time with a larger lookup table), since dividing (which is actually multiplication, since you're dividing by a constant) is the bottleneck. –  Kerrek SB Jan 5 '13 at 11:56
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5 Answers

return *id >= 100000 && *id < 1000000;

I think this may be a good solution, both easy to read and efficient.

There is no need to acquire its length if you just want to judge if it is a valid id

Program crashes because the parameter of isValidId is pointer to int, not int, so

validID = isValidId(c.id);

should be

validID = isValidId(&c.id);
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1  
+1: Why bother counting digits when you just need a simple range-check? Good one :). –  Zeta Jan 5 '13 at 12:06
1  
Way to actually think about the situation at hand. Sure if you need to actually calculate the length, you can do something else, but we're only interested in a length of 6 here. –  chris Jan 5 '13 at 12:08
    
THANKS A LOT! Please see my updated question. –  user1930901 Jan 5 '13 at 12:18
    
@user1930901 I've updated my answer –  Fei Jiang Jan 5 '13 at 12:42
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First of all, I don't see any reason to pass a pointer to isValidId function. You can pass an integer and calculate the number of digits.

bool isValidId(int id) {
    // count digits here
}

Now there are at least two ways to calculate the number of digits. First one is to use log10. The number of digits in a 10-base integer n is (int)(log10(n) + 1). You will need to import math.h to use log10. You may check whether n <= 0 before calling log10.

The second way is to loop through n.

int count = 0;

while (n > 0) {
    count++;
    n /= 10;
}
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  1. You've declared isValidId to take a pointer to an int, but you're passing it a plain int; in this case, there's no reason to use a pointer, so you'd be better off changing isValidId to use a regular int.

  2. NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER USE GETS -- IT WILL INTRODUCE A POINT OF FAILURE/MAJOR SECURITY HOLE IN YOUR CODE. Use fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin) instead.

  3. How is input declared? Is it large enough to hold as many digits as int will allow, plus a sign, plus a 0 terminator?

  4. log10 returns a double, not an int. To properly count digits with log10, you will need to write something like (int)floor(log10(id)) + 1.

You can simplify your isValidId function a little:

bool isValidId(int id)
{
  return (int) floor(log10(id)) + 1 == 6;
}

The Boolean data type is a latecomer to the C language (introduced in C99), so a lot of us older types tend to avoid using Boolean constants in our code.

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I've not done C for eons however try something like this

bool isValidId(int* id)
{
    char str[15];
    sprintf(str, "%d", id)
    if(strlen(str) != 6)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
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1  
Almost, but sprintf doesn't return the string, so you have to work around that. –  chris Jan 5 '13 at 12:04
    
@chris thanks for pointing that out like I said been many years, I've corrected the code –  Neo Jan 5 '13 at 12:23
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It's way easier like this:

#include <math.h>
bool isValidId(int *id)
{
    return (int)log10(*id) == 6;
}
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1  
id is int, atoi converts from string to int. What the heck are you doing here? itoa is probably what you mean (int to string), but it is not standard C. –  nhahtdh Jan 5 '13 at 11:59
    
Sorry, should be itoa. Got it wrong. He was using atoi, so I thought he must do it this way. –  George Sa Jan 5 '13 at 12:01
    
What compiler has itoa with such function signature? If you can gives a link to a documentation that lists itoa with the above signature, I'll consider it valid. Can only find this char * itoa ( int value, char * str, int base ); –  nhahtdh Jan 5 '13 at 12:03
1  
Note that log10 returns floating point number. You need to cast it back to int before doing the comparison. –  nhahtdh Jan 8 '13 at 8:44
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