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I'm trying to come up with a web-application, a somewhat like step-by-step or procedural application. I can't really describe it and don't know how to call it, but it is an application that presents a step-by-step instructions on how to achieve certain stuffs, like job application.

"An application that aids the user on how to do things."

So I've setup some GUI, and now I'm facing the core of the problem: database setup.

In the GUI I designed, I decided it to be like this:

Figure 1.0

Legend:

  • green with a check - completed
  • orange - the user is currently on that step
  • grey - he hasn't started any of the substeps in there.

As the picture implies, I have 3 toplevel procedures, and some other child-procedures under each procedure. One thing that is missing in that picture is that the toplevel procedures are also under a certain category.

And what I want to achieve is to keep track of users' activity. And here is the deal:

  1. It is not necessary that you must finish the first toplevel procedure to proceed to the next, you could skip and go back -> there is no problem about this.
  2. After completing all the child-procedures, the toplevel procedure flags 1 for that certain user, meaning it is completed.
  3. Same goes for the category, when all the toplevel procedures under that category is completed, the category flags 1 for that certain user, meaning he/she completed the category.

And I plan to setup my database like this :

-tbl_users-

 id    |    username    |    password    |
 -----------------------------------------
   1   |    some_user   |  adf8jkdfndsa  |
...

tbl_step_cat

 id    |      cat_name      |
 ---------------------------
   1   |    some_category   |
...

tbl_steps

 id    |      step_shortdesc     |    step_longdesc      |  cat_id 
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   1   |      some step one      |  do the following...  |     1
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   2   |      some step two      |  do the following...  |     1
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   3   |      some step three    |  do the following...  |     2
...

tbl_substeps

 id    |     substep_shortdesc   |    substep_longdesc   |  step_id 
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   1   |    some substep one     |  do the following...  |     1
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   2   |    some substep two     |  do the following...  |     1
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   3   |    some substep three   |  do the following...  |     1
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   4   |    some substep a       |  do the following...  |     2
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   5   |    some substep b       |  do the following...  |     2
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   6   |    some substep 1       |  do the following...  |     3
...

And then the relationship tables between the user and the steps

tbl_user_stepcat

 id    |     user_id   |    stepcat_id   |  datetime 
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   1   |      1        |       1         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   2   |      1        |       2         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------

tbl_user_step

 id    |     user_id   |     step_id     |  datetime 
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   1   |      1        |       1         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   2   |      1        |       2         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------

tbl_user_substep

 id    |     user_id   |    substep_id   |  datetime 
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   1   |      1        |       1         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
   2   |      1        |       2         |  sometime
 -------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm sorry if this is a bit long, it's just because of the codes.

Now my questions is how do I return my desired outcome. As you can see, when the user logs in into the application I want him/her to see those information right up.

I have never tried it as of this moment, because my brain just shuts down and is out of focus and this is my best time so far.

If I were to code the SQL of this application I will ofcourse do multiple joins.

I want to first select all categories and output it to the user.

SELECT * FROM tbl_step_cat

This will give me all the categories, and what I want to do next is to find out which step is completed or not, so that I could do the 'stylings'

I might do

SELECT cat_name FROM tbl_step_cat JOIN
tbl_user_stepcat ON tbl_user_stepcat.stepcat_id = tbl_step_cat.id
...

I'm out of focus and can't think now. How do I do these :

  1. Output all the cats/steps/substeps
  2. Fetch those who has an entry, in the relationship tables, meaning it has been completed
  3. where user = session['user']

Thank you so much, I just needed guidance.

share|improve this question
    
based on the records above, what will then be your desired result? –  John Woo Jan 10 '13 at 1:54
    
You really shouldn't store passwords like that. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 14 '13 at 21:16
    
no, that is just an example, I will prolly encrypt it with a hash and stuffs, btw, what were you thinking? –  Joey Salac Hipolito Jan 15 '13 at 9:05
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

You don't need the tables user_stepcat and user_step because they will only store redundant informations.

Every completed state is triggered by the completion of the substeps and can be retrieved by this queries

-- cat completed or not
SELECT
  sc.*, 
  MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ) completed,
  IF( MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ), 
    MAX( uss.datetime ), 
    NULL ) completed_at
FROM
  step_cat sc
LEFT JOIN steps s ON s.cat_id = sc.id
LEFT JOIN substeps ss ON ss.step_id = s.id
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss ON uss.user_id = 1 AND uss.substep_id = ss.id
GROUP BY sc.id;

-- steps completed or not
SELECT
  s.*, 
  MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ) completed,
  IF( MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ), 
    MAX( uss.datetime ), 
    NULL ) completed_at
FROM
  steps s
LEFT JOIN substeps ss ON ss.step_id = s.id
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss ON uss.user_id = 1 AND uss.substep_id = ss.id
GROUP BY s.id;

-- substeps completed or not
SELECT
  ss.*, 
  IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) completed,
  uss.datetime completed_at
FROM
  substeps ss
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss ON uss.user_id = 1 AND uss.substep_id = ss.id;

SQL Fiddle DEMO

UPDATE

To give you a more related answer to your GUI I've updated the sample data to match your screenshot.

For presentation you need to know the current user id, the category id and the step id

SET @user_id = 1; -- actual user
SET @cat_id = 1; -- actual category
SET @step_id = 2; -- actual step

and you can get the current category and complete state with

SELECT
  sc.*, 
  MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ) completed,
  IF( MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ), MAX( uss.datetime ), NULL ) completed_at
FROM
  step_cat sc
LEFT JOIN steps s ON s.cat_id = sc.id
LEFT JOIN substeps ss ON ss.step_id = s.id
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss ON 
-- limit to user
uss.user_id = @user_id 
AND uss.substep_id = ss.id
-- limit to cat
WHERE sc.id = @cat_id
GROUP BY sc.id;

the category steps and completed state with this

SELECT
  s.*, 
  MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ) completed,
  IF( MIN( IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) ), MAX( uss.datetime ), NULL ) completed_at
FROM
  steps s
LEFT JOIN substeps ss ON ss.step_id = s.id
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss
-- limit to user_id
ON uss.user_id = @user_id 
AND uss.substep_id = ss.id
-- limit to cat_id
WHERE s.cat_id = @cat_id
GROUP BY s.id;

and at least the substeps and their complete state

SELECT
  ss.*, 
  IF( uss.substep_id IS NULL, 0, 1 ) completed,
  uss.datetime completed_at
FROM
  substeps ss
LEFT JOIN user_substep uss 
-- limit to user_id
ON uss.user_id = @user_id 
AND uss.substep_id = ss.id
-- limit to step_id
WHERE ss.step_id = @step_id;

SQL Fiddle DEMO

With all of this 3 queries you have all the needed informations for GUI presentation.

share|improve this answer
    
I would love to try this out, but if you have some time to refine your answer, I would gladly appreciate it. Thank you. –  Joey Salac Hipolito Jan 10 '13 at 17:29
1  
I've updated my answer –  Sir Rufo Jan 10 '13 at 18:11
add comment

Ok, If you're just specifing JOIN, that will be an INNER JOIN, and so will exclude results where the users haven't completed each step and sub-step. So to ensure you can get a result for each join, I'd make it a LEFT JOIN. This may join it with a null result, which is fine as then you can test against whether a sub-category field is null in order to populate the tick parts on your form.

I've always believed that there's no harm in splitting your database logic into seperate queries, rather than trying to code one giant query that joins everything to everything, which may be excessive.

I think I would do a seperate query for each category, i.e.:

(pseudo)

SELECT * FROM CATEGORIES 
foreach (category) {
    SELECT * FROM SUBCATEGORIES WHERE CATEGORY = CATEGORYID
    foreach (SUBCATEGORY) {
        SELECT * FROM SUBSUBCATEGORIES WHERE SUBCATEGORY = SUBCATEGORYID
    }
}

And at each point query against the user tables to see if the user has completed each step as you iterate through the list, and use that loop to populate your ticks.

It may not be as elegant as a single mega-join, but if that's not your thing, I don't see any harm in simplifying the querying logic to help your understanding.

share|improve this answer
1  
if you're iterating over many records, this could create a problem. for each iteration, you're forced to perform yet another query. as a possible alternative, perhaps a sub-query makes more sense, to at least minimize line-congestion? –  Joshua Burns Jan 9 '13 at 14:53
1  
Fair comment, the above assumes not too many potential sub-categories otherwise I agree you'd be looping over lots of queries. –  monkeymatrix Jan 9 '13 at 15:01
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You are probably focusing too much on the database structure right now:

  • If you're on a step-page of the step-by-step procedure you can find out if the step has been finished or not. Update the status of the step.
  • If you're on a step-page you can also query all steps this step is part of and as you keep the data up-to date when visiting a single step page, you can just display the status of the step.
  • If there is no step-by-step procedure you need to update all steps at once, but only the first time you enter the step-by-step procedure.
  • If a step is like the other achievements, it is like the other achievements. Keep the configuration data of steps out of the achievements (single steps).

Then you can reduce your database structure while keeping it more flexible and also more easy to re-use procedures of your achievement system.

For example if you decide one day that you want to create an achievement if somebody has finished the whole category of what you call a stepcat if I read your question right.

All you ever need to do is to check if one or n achievements have been finished. So keep all achievements in one table regardless if they consist of other achievements or not). This belongs somewhere else. Same what a category is.

A common way is to partially de-normalize the data, e.g. you can keep some free-text with each achievement to store some data in there which a factored processing can work with.

Run janitor jobs to keep data in order, also to check if you have missed to check some achievements of higher order. You would need to do that anyway because the first moment you introduce an error with your processing, your data is broken even though in a fully normalized form you would not have any constrains violated. So you would need to do that "manual" checking anyway.

Because of all these, just do it. Don't wrap your head too much, keep it simple, finish the job, then you can think about improving it. The first suggestion I can give is to keep things simple so you can not make that many mistakes. Your system will have specialties that an answer here can't cover anyway.

So all you need is:

  1. Have a table that defines achievements
  2. Have a table that stores if a user has finished an achievement.
  3. Have processing that can tell if an achievement has been finished or not.
  4. Have processing to finish an achievement.

While:

  • Each step in a multi-step form is an achievement as well.

Whether or not is a multi-step is merely not really interesting. It's just a standard achievement. That would be the largest benefit. Encapsulate the differences into the processing, not the data-structure. This will allow you to adopt now and in the future.

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Do you mean your SQL schema looks like step_cat <- steps <- substeps ?

If so, the tables tbl_user_stepcat and tbl_user_step are useless since you can get all parent information from a given substep/step/cat using JOIN queries.

If you want to follow user achievements you should just have an "achievement_history" table focusing on user, substep and a defined status which might take a specific value depending on its achievement. This way each line refers to a given user substep achievement,then each time a given substep will have the correct achievement status, the user will be able to treat another substep and a new line will be inserted.

Remember that using nested queries is such an ugly way to proceed because the DBMS will never be able to plan the query and possibly store a pre-defined way to get a quick result as it should, using indexes and foreign keys if they were correctly set.

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U have to write 3 Stored Procedures at the backend and call them with the input Session[Username] from the front end..

storedprocedure1 .. listofcategories.. input - nothing, output - category attributes

storedprocedure2.. listofcategories_filtered_by_user.. input- Session[UserName] output- category attributes

Inside this stored procedure write the Join that u wrote SELECT cat_name FROM tbl_step_cat JOIN tbl_user_stepcat ON tbl_user_stepcat.stepcat_id = tbl_step_cat.id

storedprocedure3.. listofsubcategories_filtered_by_user.. input- Session[UserName] output- (sub category attributes)

Inside this stored procedure write the Join for subcategories

> Now call each Storedprocedure from the Front End with the input Session[UserName] parameter

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