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I am reading "On lisp" and encountered this code (I simplified it a bit).

CL-USER> (defun foo ()                                                          
           '(a b c))
FOO                                                                             
CL-USER> (foo)
(A B C)                                                                         
CL-USER> (nconc * '(D E))
(A B C D E)                                                                     
CL-USER> (foo)
(A B C D E) 
CL-USER> (defun foo ()                                                          
          (list 'a 'b 'c))
STYLE-WARNING: redefining FOO in DEFUN                                          
FOO                                                                             
CL-USER> (foo)
(A B C)                                                                         
CL-USER> (nconc * '(D E))
(A B C D E)                                                                     
CL-USER> (foo)
(A B C)
  • What exactly does * mean? Is it the previous function call? Is it suitable to use in real world code?

  • Why does (nconc * '(D E)) change the return value of the first foo function?

  • I always thought (list 'a 'b 'c) and '(a b c) are the same? What is the difference?

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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The call to LIST creates a new list each time it is evaluated. The list literal might be placed in a read-only memory segment after compilation. A destructive update on the lists with NCONC is then problematic, possibly with undefined consequences (segmentation error, changing the literal for future references, or nothing at all).

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hadn't thought of that ;) –  Robert Karl Sep 13 '09 at 9:33
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Variables *, ** and *** are specified by the language standard and they are quite useful when testing things. They are a feature of the REPL, and so are not, and not supposed to, be useful in a "real world code".

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+1 for HyperSpec reference –  sigjuice Sep 14 '09 at 3:16
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