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I am reading a problem on Dynamic Programming. The problem is the following:

Break a string of characters of length n into a sequence of valid words. Assume that there is a datastructure that tells you if a string is a valid word in constant time.

I solved it some way of mine, but then the solution I read was the following:

Create a table T[N] which says that T[i] is true if the substring [0...i] can be broken into a sequence of valid words. T[i] is true iff there exists a j, 0<=j<=k-1 where T[j] is true AND S(j,k) is a valid word

This is a classic formulation for DP but isn't it wrong? Shouldn't it be:

T[i] is true iff there exists a j, 0<=j<=k-1 where T[j] is true AND S(j+1,k) is a valid word OR S(0,i) is a valid word?

Otherwise I don't see how the table could ever be constructed since for example for the string: itsthe we will never have T[2] = true if we don't take into account that its is a word and the next sequence is the i.e. S(2+1, N) for j = 2.
Am I right here? But how can we then find the actual words?
Example code I made for my understanding (s.substring(i,j) returns the substring from i including j-1 in java):

int i = 0  
for(; i < s.length(); i++){  
   for(int j = 0; j > i; j++){  
       if(T[j] && dictionary.contains(s.substring(j + 1, i)){  
             T[i] = true;
             break;  
       }  
    }  
    if(dictionary.contains(s.substring(0, i + 1)){  
         T[i] = true;  
    }  
}  
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are right in all your corrections.

If you want to reconstruct the actual words add one more table array that will tell you the last word length you used to set t[i] to true. Lets call this array L[i]

T[i] is true iff there exists a j, 0<=j<=k-1 where T[j] is true AND S(j+1,k) is a valid word OR S(0,i) is a valid word? In the first case you set L[i] = j in the latter - L[i] = i.

Then add the end you just need to recurse back from L[n], where n is the total length of the given string.

share|improve this answer
    
In L is that the index or the length stored? – Cratylus Jan 5 '13 at 14:57
    
@Cratylus index. However, as you are interested only in splitting the whole string then those two somehow coincide. You can, however, use the approach i propose even if you were interested in splitting the longest part possible. – Boris Strandjev Jan 5 '13 at 14:59
    
So L[n] will give the index of the last word and then I go to L[n-1] for the previous word and then L[n-2] etc? – Cratylus Jan 5 '13 at 15:05
    
@Cratylus: no, L[n-L[n]] ist the next one, etc. – WolframH Jan 5 '13 at 15:14
    
@WolframH:I can't follow the sequence.What comes next of that? – Cratylus Jan 5 '13 at 15:18

It depends on what your notation means, specifically for choosing subsequences. You mix square and round brackets, "substring [0...i]" and "S(j+1,k)"; I suggest that we always include the left hand index and never the right hand index. This is sometimes made explicit by using a square bracket on the left hand side and a round parenthesis on the right hand side: S[0...i).

If we do that, then the original phrasing is almost correct; there is some confusion between i and k, which should, I think, be the same, and the case i = 0 is not handled correctly. (On a related note, I think the case n = 0 (the empty string) may also not be handled correctly by your modification.)

Create a table T[N] which says that T[i] is true if the substring S[0...i)
can be broken into a sequence of valid words. T[i] is true iff i = 0 OR
(there exists a j, 0<=j<i, where T[j] is true AND S[j...i) is a valid word).
share|improve this answer
    
The notation is not mine.I can only assume that [0..i] is meant to include i for the reason you point out – Cratylus Jan 5 '13 at 16:12

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