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I wrote a String sorting program in C++ and my question is which is basically read some string chunks from a txt file and put into a vector and sort the strings. First I measured the sort execution time using a single threaded program. Then I divide the vector into two protions and sorted them using two threads. But the problem is that multi threaded program took more time to execute than the single threaded program. Can someone explain me what is the reason?.. Thanks.

By the way the string vector contains 20 characters long 1 million string records and I have not added the file read function.

Single Thread Program..

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <intrin.h>

#pragma intrinsic(__rdtsc)
using namespace std;

vector<string> ReadFile();


int main()
{

vector<string> RandomStringVector;
unsigned __int64 t1,t2;

RandomStringVector = ReadFile();

t1 = __rdtsc();
sort(RandomStringVector.begin(),RandomStringVector.end());
t2 = __rdtsc();
printf_s("%I64d ticks\n", (t2 - t1)/1000000);

system("pause");
return 0;
}

This is the Multi Threaded Program

#include <process.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <intrin.h>

#pragma intrinsic(__rdtsc)
using namespace std;

void SortString(void * arg);
vector<string> ReadFile();

int main(){ 

vector<string> FullStringVector;
FullStringVector = ReadFile();

vector<string> v1(FullStringVector.begin(), FullStringVector.begin() + FullStringVector.size()/2),
    v2(FullStringVector.begin() + FullStringVector.size()/2 +1, FullStringVector.end());


_beginthread( SortString, 0, (void *)&v1);
_beginthread( SortString, 0, (void *)&v2);

system("pause");
return 0;
}

void SortString(void *arg)
{
unsigned __int64 t1,t2;
vector<string> * StringVector;
vector<string> SortedStringVector;
StringVector = (vector<string> *)arg;
SortedStringVector = *StringVector;
t1 = __rdtsc();
sort(SortedStringVector.begin(),SortedStringVector.end());
t2 = __rdtsc();
printf_s("%I64d ticks\n", (t2 - t1)/1000000);

}
share|improve this question
    
Did you profile your program? Or did you use a stopwatch? Also on what machine are you testing your single-/multi-threaded application? –  Zeta Jan 5 '13 at 15:17
    
@Zeta I ran the two programs around 5 times each. I'm relatively new to C++ and Multi Threading programs. I used the cpu timestamp diffrence to get the execution time. I used my laptop which is Intel core i3 2.1GHz, 2Gb RAM in Windows 7 to test the program. –  Zeus Jan 5 '13 at 15:21
2  
Add some code to check the result. You'll find that the multi-threaded version doesn't produce the correct answer. Don't try to make it fast until after you've got it correct. –  Pete Becker Jan 5 '13 at 15:21
    
What did your timing using rdtsc() show? –  brian beuning Jan 5 '13 at 15:28
3  
The "SortedStringVector = *StringVector;" copies the vector and copies all the strings in the vector. This is very expensive. –  brian beuning Jan 5 '13 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, you are using processor-clock ticks to measure the performance, and by that measure any multi-threaded algorithm will be slower than an equivalent single-threaded algorithm. The reason is because this measure effectively counts the number of instructions that gets executed and threading always adds a little overhead to an algorithm.

To get a proper measurement of performance, you need to measure the wall-clock time. This way, the measurement can accurately reflect the work that gets done in parallel by different cores/processors.

Also, when adapting an algorithm for parallel execution, you need to make sure that the algorithm remains consistent (in your question, the single-threaded and multi-threaded sorts are not identical. The multi-threaded version needs an additional pass to sort the two halves together) and that there is not too much communication overhead between the threads (not really an issue here, but consider an algorithm where thread X needs the result from thread Y before it can calculate its own result).

share|improve this answer
    
I executed the same programs in my desktop computer which consists a intel Dual Core 2.7GHz and 2GB RAM. This time I measured the time using the clock() difference. It surprise me that single threaded program resulted 60035 and multi threaded program resulted 48279, 48414. Which clearly shown the improvement. Is this execution difference because of the laptop processor is core i3 and desktop is Dual Core??? –  Zeus Jan 6 '13 at 4:51
    
First, clock is still the wrong function, because it also counts processor ticks. Secondly, to see the benefits of parallel processing, you need to measure the overall time, not the time used by individual threads. And thirdly, you generally can't compare these kinds of measurements between different computers. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 6 '13 at 8:20

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