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I am learning the decorator pattern from the Head First Design Patterns book , and here's what I've coded (C++) to get the pattern to work:

#include <iostream>


class AbstractType
{
public: 
    virtual double value() const = 0;
};


class FirstConcreteType
    :
    public AbstractType
{
public: 
    double value() const 
    {
        return 1; 
    }
};

class SecondConcreteType
    : 
    public AbstractType
{
public:
    double value() const
    {
        return 2;
    }
};

class DecoratorType
    :
    public AbstractType
{
    const AbstractType* decoratedObject_; 

public:

    DecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
        :
    decoratedObject_(&abstractObject)
    {}

    DecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
        :
    decoratedObject_(&decoratorObject)
    {}

    virtual double value() const = 0; 

    const AbstractType& getObject() const
    {
        return *decoratedObject_; 
    }
};

class FirstDecoratorType
    :
    public DecoratorType
{
public:
    FirstDecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
        :
    DecoratorType(abstractObject)
    {}

    FirstDecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
        :
    DecoratorType(decoratorObject)
    {}

    double value() const
    {
        const AbstractType& object = getObject(); 

        return 1 + object.value(); 
    }
};

class SecondDecoratorType
    :
    public DecoratorType
{
public:
    SecondDecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
        :
    DecoratorType(abstractObject)
    {}

    SecondDecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
        :
    DecoratorType(decoratorObject)
    {}

    double value() const
    {
        const AbstractType& object = getObject(); 

        return 2 + object.value(); 
    }
};

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // When I decorate sequentially, it works fine

    SecondConcreteType secondConc;

    FirstDecoratorType firstDec(secondConc); 
    cout << firstDec.value() << endl;

    SecondDecoratorType secondDec(firstDec); 
    cout << secondDec.value() << endl;

    FirstDecoratorType firstDecSecond (secondDec); 
    cout << firstDecSecond.value() << endl; 

    // Decorating in a single line, messes things up, since there is no
    // constructor taking the value argument defined.  
    //FirstDecoratorType firstDynamicDec (SecondConcreteType()); 
    //cout << firstDynamicDec.value() << endl;

    return 0;
};

In the main program, the object of theh ConcreteType must be created first, and then it is decorated using composition of the pointer to the AbstractType (within the DecoratorType). It works fine, if I create the concrete objects, and create the new decorated objects one after another..

What do I need to do in order for the DecoratorType to be able to decorate objects using composition in a single line of code (commented out line in the example code)? Would something like this be useful at all in the "real world"? I (obviously) don't have a lot of experience in using design patterns.. so it's difficult for me to see what functionality I should aim at.

EDIT:

Here's a version working with basic pointers (valgrind shows no memory leaks, and states that no memory leaks are possible):

#include <iostream>


class AbstractType
{
    public: 
        virtual double value() const = 0;

        virtual ~AbstractType() {}; 
};

class FirstConcreteType
:
    public AbstractType
{
    public: 
        double value() const 
        {
            return 1; 
        }
};

class SecondConcreteType
: 
    public AbstractType
{
    public:
        double value() const
        {
            return 2;
        }
};

class DecoratorType
:
    public AbstractType
{
    const AbstractType* decoratedObject_; 
    bool own_;

    public:

        DecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
            :
                decoratedObject_(&abstractObject), 
                own_(false)
        {}

        DecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
            :
                decoratedObject_(&decoratorObject), 
                own_(false)

        {}

        DecoratorType (AbstractType* abstractPtr)
            : 
                decoratedObject_(abstractPtr), 
                own_(true)
        {}

        DecoratorType (DecoratorType* decoratorPtr)
            :
                decoratedObject_(decoratorPtr), 
                own_(true)
        {}

        virtual ~DecoratorType()
        {
            if (own_)
            {
                delete decoratedObject_; 
                decoratedObject_ = 0;
            }
        }

        virtual double value() const = 0; 

        const AbstractType& getObject() const
        {
            return *decoratedObject_; 
        }
};

class FirstDecoratorType
:
    public DecoratorType
{
    public:
        FirstDecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
            :
                DecoratorType(abstractObject)
        {}

        FirstDecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
            :
                DecoratorType(decoratorObject)
        {}

        FirstDecoratorType (AbstractType* abstractPtr)
            :
                DecoratorType(abstractPtr)
        {}

        FirstDecoratorType (FirstDecoratorType* decoratorPtr)
            :
                DecoratorType(decoratorPtr)
        {}


        double value() const
        {
            const AbstractType& object = getObject(); 

            return 1 + object.value(); 
        }
};

class SecondDecoratorType
:
    public DecoratorType
{
    public:
        SecondDecoratorType(const AbstractType& abstractObject)
            :
                DecoratorType(abstractObject)
        {}

        SecondDecoratorType(const DecoratorType& decoratorObject)
            :
                DecoratorType(decoratorObject)
        {}

        SecondDecoratorType (AbstractType* abstractPtr)
            :
                DecoratorType(abstractPtr)
        {}

        SecondDecoratorType (SecondDecoratorType* decoratorPtr)
            :
                DecoratorType(decoratorPtr)
        {}

        double value() const
        {
            const AbstractType& object = getObject(); 

            return 2 + object.value(); 
        }
};

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // When I decorate sequentially, it works fine

    SecondConcreteType secondConc;

    FirstDecoratorType firstDec(secondConc); 
    cout << firstDec.value() << endl;

    SecondDecoratorType secondDec(firstDec); 
    cout << secondDec.value() << endl;

    FirstDecoratorType firstDecSecond (secondDec); 
    cout << firstDecSecond.value() << endl; 

    // Decorating in a single line, messes things up, since there is no
    // constructor taking the value argument defined.  
    FirstDecoratorType firstDynamicDec (new SecondDecoratorType (
           new FirstDecoratorType (new SecondConcreteType()))); 

    cout << firstDynamicDec.value() << endl;

    return 0;
};
share|improve this question
2  
The problem is that you're saving pointers to object passed in as a const reference - which means those may be temporary. Which is bad. You should probably pass in a shared_ptr or a unique_ptr instead. –  Cubic Jan 5 '13 at 15:59
    
Yeah, I think 'FirstDecoratorType firstDynamicDec (new SecondConcreteType());' is the way to go –  nishantjr Jan 5 '13 at 16:11
    
Passing smart pointers will transfer ownership to the decorator. This seems not like what I need, and what the pattern is explaining: to add stuff to objects at runtime. I don't want the destructor of the DecoratorType to delete the decorated object (*ConcreteType). –  tmaric Jan 5 '13 at 16:12
    
Hmmm... I don't see how that can work and still allow the one line thing –  nishantjr Jan 5 '13 at 16:17
1  
@tomislav-maric If you pass a shared_ptr, then the destructor of your decorator won't destroy your object if there are other shared_ptrs to it- and you obviously shouldn't use raw pointers with owning semantics of an object that has a shared_ptr referencing it. But you clearly have owner semantics here in your Decorator, after all your decorator won't be valid anymore if the decorated object dies. –  Cubic Jan 5 '13 at 18:19
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
FirstDecoratorType firstDynamicDec (SecondConcreteType()); 

The problem with this is that it does NOT define an object. Instead, it declares a function. Look for most-vexing-parse in C++ on this site, you will get lots of topics on it.

Short explanation : the function name is firstDynamicDec whose return type is FirstDecoratorType and it takes parameter which is again a function returning SecondConcreteType and taking no argument.

share|improve this answer
1  
That is a problem, but I wouldn't say the problem in this example. –  Cubic Jan 5 '13 at 16:08
    
This is far from the only problem. The above code also has serious object lifetime issues. –  Yakk Jan 5 '13 at 16:09
2  
@tomislav-maric: Yes. If the constructor takes pointer instead of reference that would be better, because in that case the class itself indicates to the world that I'm going to use the pointer internally, so "make sure that the object you pass as pointer exists as long as you use me". Or even better if you use smart pointer. –  Nawaz Jan 5 '13 at 16:22
1  
@tomislav-maric No, use a smart pointer. In both the interface and stored internally. unique_ptr and shared_ptr are both reasonable candidates. –  Yakk Jan 5 '13 at 16:22
1  
@tomislav-maric: Yes, smart pointers has almost nothing to do with better design. It is just that if you don't want to take the burden of deleting the object (possibly because you think you're not smart enough to handle that properly), then smart pointers assist you there. However, the really smart programmers may avoid using smart pointers, because smart pointers cause the objects to live longer than they need to (the same problem GC has). –  Nawaz Jan 5 '13 at 16:32
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The first problem is that

FirstDecoratorType firstDynamicDec (SecondConcreteType()); 

does not declare an object at all, but a function. This is called the most vexing parse of C++.

But even when you work around that, you have the problem that temporary objects (such as created by SecondConcreteTpe()) only exist until the end of the expression, so the pointer within FirstDecoratorType would be invalid before you can do anything useful with it.
You can resolve this by using smart pointers to hold the decorated type within the decorator (for example, std::unique_ptr). This makes the decorator responsible for cleaning up the decorated type.

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