Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't figure out the guidance for this text-based RPG. I want the player's input to choose between one of four classes, then save that class and assign stats to it. For now, it only works if I choose "Warrior". What am I doing wrong?

stats = Hash.new
stats["Strength"] = 10
stats["Dexterity"] = 10
stats["Charisma"] = 10
stats["Stamina"] = 10
puts "Hello, brave adventurer.  What is your name?"
player_name = gets.chomp.capitalize

puts "Well, #{player_name}, you are certainly brave!  Choose your profession.  (Choose         from Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief)."

player_class = gets.chomp.downcase

while player_class != ("warrior" || "thief" || "archer" || "wizard")
  puts "I do not recognize #{player_class} as a valid class.  Please choose between     Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief."
  player_class = gets.chomp.downcase
end

if player_class == "warrior"
  puts "Yay a warrior!"
  stats["Strength"] = 20
elsif player_class == "thief"
  puts "yay a thief!"
  stats["Dexterity"] = 20
elsif player_class == "archer"
  puts "yay an archer!"
elsif player_class == "wizard"
  puts "Sweet a wizard!"
end
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Andrew Marshall, CodeGnome, David Robinson, Soner Gönül, 0x499602D2 Jan 5 '13 at 21:19

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Please try and use a better title. Further, actually describe what “only works” means—what happens for other values and what do you instead expect to happen? –  Andrew Marshall Jan 5 '13 at 16:47
    
Added a revised version of your code. –  EmacsFodder Jan 6 '13 at 10:48

3 Answers 3

It's very simple.

1.9.3p194 :001 > ("warrior" || "thief" || "archer" || "wizard")
 => "warrior" 

The logical OR of several strings evaluates to the first one.

You could replace that line by something like:

while player_class != "warrior" and player_class != "thief" and player_class !=  "archer" and player_class != "wizard"
share|improve this answer
2  
There has to be a simpler way of doing this than writing out "IF = warrior" then "if = thief" and such. I want to learn the simplest/mots correct way so my code isnt ugly. –  Jeremy Matthew Shreve Jan 5 '13 at 16:03
    
The more generic way is using a Set, and do what Slomojo suggests. It doesn't matter in this case because you only have four elements, but if you had millions it might matter because a Set offers O(1) lookup vs. O(N) for the array. –  Diego Basch Jan 5 '13 at 16:05
    
@DiegoBasch ... Millions isn't going to be a problem here ;) and we'd be talking about breaking this up into classes etc before we got to issues of scale. (JMS hasn't even got to function definitions yet!) –  EmacsFodder Jan 5 '13 at 16:07
1  
Please note that and/or is not the same as &&/|| in Ruby. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 5 '13 at 16:43

Try setting up the classes as an array...

player_classes = ["warrior", "thief", "archer", "wizard"]

And then when you want to check if the player has entered a valid class...

while ! player_classes.include? player_class 

instead.

You can use an even nicer idiom for single words...

%w(warrior thief archer wizard)

Generates

["warrior", "thief", "archer", "wizard"]

Moving forward

You could take this approach a step forward by putting the player classes into a hash.

For example:

player_classes = {
  'warrior' => {:message => "Yay a warrior!", :stats => {:strength => 20} },
  'thief'   => {:message => "Ooh a thief!", :stats => {:dexterity => 20} },
  'archer'  => {:message => "Cool! an archer" },
  'wizard'  => {:message => "Sweet! a wizard" }
}

You can then do things like this:

while ! player_classes.key? player_class

Once you've got a match you can then pull the values out of the hash, like this:

selected_class = player_classes[player_class]
stats.merge selected_class[:stats] if selected_class[:stats] 

If there's no stats in the hash for that player class nothing will happen, if there is, it'll be merged in.

e.g. to test this...

selected_class = player_classes['warrior']
stats.merge selected_class[:stats] if selected_class[:stats] 

# stats is now {:strength=>20, :dexterity=>10, :charisma=>10, :stamina=>10}

selected_class = player_classes['wizard']
stats.merge selected_class[:stats] if selected_class[:stats] 

# stats is now {:strength=>10, :dexterity=>10, :charisma=>10, :stamina=>10}

We can then show the message with:

puts player_classes[player_class][:message]

This would reduce your logic down to capturing the player class input and then processing the hash.

Revisting your original code

Using a hash to act as a simple data-model.

You'd end up with code like this:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

stats = { :strength => 10, :dexterity => 10, :charisma => 10, :stamina => 10 }

player_classes = {
  'warrior' => {:message => "Yay a warrior!", :stats => {:strength => 20} },
  'thief'   => {:message => "Ooh a thief!", :stats => {:dexterity => 20} },
  'archer'  => {:message => "Cool! an archer" },
  'wizard'  => {:message => "Sweet! a wizard" }
}

puts "Welcome brave adventurer, what is your name?"
player_name = gets.chomp.capitalize

puts "Well, #{player_name}, you are certainly brave!  Choose your profession.  (Choose from Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief)."
player_class = gets.chomp.downcase

while ! player_classes.key? player_class
  puts "I do not recognize #{player_class} as a valid class.  Please choose between Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief."
  player_class = gets.chomp.downcase
end

selected_class = player_classes[player_class]
stats.merge selected_class[:stats] if selected_class[:stats] 

puts selected_class[:message]

You should also find this more readable, however, as you extend your game, you'll find that you can't easily work with code like this. You should next learn about using functions to break up your code into different routines. There are also more things you can do with arrays, hashes and collections.

Also, as soon as possible, you should start learning about programming Ruby in an Object Oriented style, which is how it should be used, ideally.

Tutorials Point is a pretty decent site for learning more about Ruby

share|improve this answer
    
Very cool! Gonna put them in an array now. Thank you. –  Jeremy Matthew Shreve Jan 5 '13 at 16:03
    
No worries, happy to help @JeremyMatthewShreve –  EmacsFodder Jan 5 '13 at 16:06
    
I don't think this should be a recommended solution. It will have to check the input against the list of words, then once that is confirmed, it will go through the same list of words in the if condition. That goes against DRY. It will make it difficult to maintain the code as the code grows. –  sawa Jan 5 '13 at 16:43
    
@Slomojo Whether lightweighted or not is not a problem. The problem is the repetition of information. You do not suggest anything about the if condition part that would follow validation. My answer only utilises that part. I did not add any routine. I just used one (if/case condition) to remove the other (validation). I did not add anything hardcoded. –  sawa Jan 6 '13 at 4:34
    
@Slomojo Boomerang to you. –  sawa Jan 6 '13 at 5:46

For what you did wrong, see Diego's answer.

This is a typical case where you should use the case statement. You can cut out the routine to get the player class like this:

public
def get_player_class
  case player_class = gets.chomp.downcase
  when "warrior" then puts "Yay a warrior!"; stats["Strength"] = 20
  when "thief" then puts "yay a thief!"; stats["Dexterity"] = 20
  when "archer" then puts "yay an archer!"; true
  when "wizard" then puts "Sweet a wizard!"; true
  else puts "I do not recognize #{player_class} as a valid class. "\
    "Please choose between Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief."; false
  end
end

stats = {"Strength" => 10, "Dexterity" => 10, "Charisma" => 10, "Stamina" => 10,}
puts "Hello, brave adventurer.  What is your name?"
player_name = gets.chomp.capitalize
puts "Well, #{player_name}, you are certainly brave! "\
  "Choose your profession.  (Choose from Warrior, Wizard, Archer, or Thief)."
nil until get_player_class
share|improve this answer
    
If you really want to refactor it, the metadata for these classes is better as a data structure, and then simply pluck out the stats, and the "welcome" message... don't encourage hardcoding it. –  EmacsFodder Jan 5 '13 at 16:29
    
@Slomojo That is not the focus of the question. The focus is to route the choice depending on the input. Of course a more object oriented structure would be preferable, but the OP is using local variables all over the place. Structuring all that goes way beyond what is asked. –  sawa Jan 5 '13 at 16:32

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.