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When Firefox updated to version 17, the formatting on a couple of my websites went a little crazy. This was not an issue in version 16 - or any version before, and I can't quite figure out where the issue lies. The sites display correctly in all versions of IE (7+) and Chrome, and Firefox 16 or earlier.

http://seamlyne.com (costumes)

http://conklincars.com (autos)

and conklincarshutchinson.com (autos - problem is even worse here, probably just because there's more stuff.)

It appears that background-position and text-indent are being ignored in ver. 17. Any help or advice?

  • Bill in KC
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The page (seamlyne.com is the only one I looked at) uses the invalid value -9999 for text-indent. Per spec, text-indent takes a length, not a number, so it should be -9999px.

Now the page is in quirks mode and Gecko used to accept unitless lengths for all properties in quirks mode (defaulting the unit to pixels). But that got changed in Firefox 17 to follow the proposed CSS3 Syntax spec, which actually defines quirks CSS parsing, and that spec does not have this quirk for text-indent (or background-position, in case that matters on this page). See https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=774122 and http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css3-syntax/#unitless-length-quirk-list (as of today, at least).

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Thank you! So is it safe to assume, then, that anything not on the unitless length quirk list (such as "background-position") will likewise have to have "px" on the end? –  Bill in Kansas City Jan 8 '13 at 1:47
    
Yes, exactly. In general, you want to just put "px" on the end in all cases; relying on the quirks is not great, because at some point you might end up with a standards-mode document and then they'll all get turned off. –  Boris Zbarsky Jan 8 '13 at 6:48
    
@Boris: Well, do you think that this changement in CSS3 is a good or bad changement? Because not all changements are good. And I experienced in the last few years, that some changement are often doing bad harm or even worsening a problem. This is probably the sad reality behind product life cycles: Many Products are getting a bad quality by the time, so in the end the consumer are just buying other products. Quality is the only reason firms can survive in a market. If you look at the firms that are 50 years old or more: They are all creating expensive, high quality products. –  Marcus Feb 24 '13 at 21:47
    
It's not the price, it's the quality. If a product breaks, I'll never going to buy the same product again. This happens with laptops, shoes, even washing machine and cars. Look at an example fromt he IT world: The Android OS is bad, inconsistent, crashes a lot if you install the "wrong" app. So I'll never going to buy an Android phone in the future, it'll be a Windows 8 phone or an iPhone. That's just how a market works. Markets are not nice, but honest. Always listen to the market. ;) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Marcus Feb 24 '13 at 21:50
    
Given that web sites that used this value for text-indent were already broken in other browsers (since not all browsers allowed unitless lengths for text-indent, I believe), I'm not sure there's a problem here... –  Boris Zbarsky Feb 25 '13 at 3:04
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