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I have the below code example where I want to prepend some text on to the front of the source param which could be of type ISite or IFactory used in a MVC drop down list via a MoreLinq extension. This function is used in a controller action that returns the list serialised as JSON so that it can be loaded dynamically using some dropdown cascading, otherwise I would have done this separately in a view model.

I was wondering if there is a way to be able to do something similar to the below without having to create a concrete ListItem class, my example shows how I am using as IListItem but I am aware this won't compile.

At the moment my controller has no concept of any of my model's concrete classes and I kind of wanted to keep it that way and I'm not sure if I definately need to make an instance of a ListItem to make this work or if anyone has another suggestion?

My knowledge of Covariance and Contravariance in Generics is limited, in case that is of importance here? Thanks

    public interface IListItem
    {
        int Id { get; set; }
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public interface ISite : IListItem
    {
        int CountryId { get; set; }
    }

    public interface IFactory : IListItem
    {
        int SiteId { get; set; }
    }

    public interface IResource
    {
        int Id { get; set; }
        string Name { get; set; }
        int ContentID { get; set; }
        string Text { get; set; }
        int LanguageID { get; set; }
        string LanguageCode { get; set; }
        int Priority { get; set; }
    }

private IEnumerable<IListItem> PrependSelectionResource(IEnumerable<IListItem> source, string languageCode)
{
    if(source == null || source.Count() == 1)
        return source; // don't bother prepending the relevant resource in these cases

    try
    {
        // will throw an exception if languageCode is null or blank
        var resource = _resourceRepository.GetByNameAndLanguageCode(
            "Prompt_PleaseSelect",
            languageCode);

        if(resource == null)
            return source;

        // prepend the "Please Select" resource to the beginning of the source
        // using MoreLinq extension
        return source.Prepend(new {
            Id = 0,
            Name = resource.Text ?? ""
        } as IListItem);
    }
    catch {
        return source;
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there's nothing you can do. You'll have to pass a concrete instance of a class that implements the IListItem interface to the Prepend method.

If you're worried about exposing implementations elsewhere in your application, you could create a local implementation to your file called PlaceholderListItem and use that instead.

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Thanks for the reply. That says to me then that I might benefit from having my _resourceRepository be able to return a resource as a IListItem maybe? only its a bit out of place because I only really need the resource.Text and the Id I would prefer to be "" but its likely needs to be 0.. rather than the resource's record ID –  Pricey Jan 5 '13 at 17:16
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An anonymous type (like new { Id = 0, Name = resource.Text ?? "" }) is a class that does not implement any interfaces (and has no other base classes than object). So it won't work.

If you use a mocking framework, you can create a mock that is some magically generated class which implements the interface. Sometimes also called a stub.

But in this case, it's really easy to write your own mock, of course:

class ListItemMock : IListItem
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
}

then you can instantiate it with an object initializer: new ListItemMock { Id = 0, Name = resource.Text ?? "", }.

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Thanks for the clarification –  Pricey Jan 5 '13 at 17:53
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