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I would like to add a zero to the middle of a line of formatted text using sed or awk.

Example Input File

line 1

line 2

line 3

Expected Output

line 01

line 02

line 03
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If we had slightly more information, we could provide more help. For instance, does the "line" text have spaces or tabs in it? Is that a space between "line" and "1", or is that a tab? –  theJollySin Jan 5 '13 at 17:31

6 Answers 6

There is some ambiguity with your question but how about using printf with awk to pad the second field with zeros:

$ awk 'NF==2 { printf "%s %02d\n", $1, $2}' file
line 01
line 02
line 03
line 10
line 100

$ awk 'NF==2 { printf "%s %04d\n", $1, $2}' file
line 0001
line 0002
line 0003
line 0010
line 0100

If you don't want blank lines stripped do awk 'NF==2 { printf "%s %04d\n", $1, $2} NF!=2' file.

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+1 for a good solution but the above would strip the blank lines. –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 17:38
    
@EdMorton I was editing as you posted :] would be nice to have a representative example because I'm sure that actual file will have more than 2 fields anyway. –  iiSeymour Jan 5 '13 at 17:42
    
Agreed. I'd probably not use the same condition negated but use next instead: awk 'NF==2 { printf "%s %04d\n", $1, $2; next} 1. –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 17:44

Use a POSIX Character Class with Backreference

Given /tmp/foo containing:

line 1

line 2

line 3

you can call sed 's/[[:digit:]]/0&/' /tmp/foo in order to get the following output:

line 01

line 02

line 03
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Note this will only work for single digits, line 10 becomes line 0100 to fix this use sed 's/[[:digit:]]\+/0&/' –  iiSeymour Jan 5 '13 at 17:46

In awk this is quite easy:

awk '{print $1, 0$2}' input.txt > output.txt

In this case the input text you have shown is in the file input.txt and I saved it to a new file output.txt.

This is also an easy command to understand. The $1 variable is your "line" text and the $2 variable is your number. This command assumes there are no spaces in your "line" text. Are there?

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1  
Just be aware that would do more than simply put a zero in front of the 2nd field. If the OPs input file is tab-separated, for example, then it won't be any longer after that operation. You could also just use , instead of " " if you want to use this approach since that's what the OFS is designed for. –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 17:23
    
@EdMorton Agreed. If I knew a little bit more about what was in that "line" text, I could make this more robust, to be sure. But all I can do right now is assume the OP wrote exactly what he wanted. –  theJollySin Jan 5 '13 at 17:29
    
That's fine but it's just worth saying since the OP probably wouldn't be able to guess there were consequences. –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 17:36

The simplest answer to your question as posted is:

sed 's/ / 0/'

If that doesn't do it, post some more representative input and expected output as there are many things you might need to take into account.

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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's/\</0/2' file
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awk 'NF==2{$2="0"$2}1' your_file
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