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I can't figure out how to grep the lines I want in this file:

8.txt  07:34:12 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:34:42 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  07:35:08 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:36:33 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  07:57:51 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:57:52 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:58:25 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  07:58:36 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:59:24 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:20:23 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:21:22 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:22:44 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:34:12 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:23:07 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:26:35 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:27:24 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:29:53 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:30:28 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:30:59 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:31:21 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  08:48:28 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:48:56 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  09:13:10 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  09:13:40 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  09:13:52 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  09:14:44 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  09:19:50 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  09:20:28 <-CONTENT END
8.txt  09:27:04 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  09:27:40 <-CONTENT END

If CONTENT START occurrence on consecutive lines then display them.

Output expected:

8.txt  07:57:51 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:57:52 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:22:44 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:34:12 -> CONTENT START

How can this be done?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This isn't a task for grep use uniq for this:

$ uniq -D -f4 file
8.txt  07:57:51 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:57:52 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  08:22:44 -> CONTENT START
8.txt  07:34:12 -> CONTENT START

The option -D is for displaying the duplicated lines and -f4 skips the first four fields.

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uniq requires the input to be sorted, the OPs posted sample input isn't. –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 18:07
2  
No it doesn't Ed, in most circumstances you would want you input sorted first but this is definitely not one of them. Uniq only compare consecutive lines so it's perfect here and hence when it's commonly used with sort. Read man uniq for a better explanation. –  iiSeymour Jan 5 '13 at 18:10
    
Well it certainly seems to be working so I stand corrected, thanks. You live and learn... –  Ed Morton Jan 5 '13 at 18:12

You don't say what to do if CONTENT START appears on 3 consecutive lines so this may or may not be what you want:

awk -v s="CONTENT START" '$0~s && p~s{print p ORS $0} {p=$0}' file
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