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I'm trying to achieve the equivalent of the following C# code:

someStringValue = someStringValue ?? string.Empty;

Where if someStringValue is null, a value of string.Empty (the empty string: "") will be assigned. How do I achieve this in Objective-C? Is my only option:

if(!someStringValue)
   someStringValue = @"";
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I feel that the if version is much more simple and readable in Obj-C. –  Sulthan Apr 23 at 12:53
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Simple, using ternary operator.

someStringValue = someStringValue ? someStringValue : @"";

Or if you want a macro, you can do that too.

#if !defined(StringOrEmpty)
    #define StringOrEmpty(A)  ({ __typeof__(A) __a = (A); __a ? __a : @""; })
#endif

Sample usage:

someStringValue = StringOrEmpty(someStringValue);
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8  
... or even just someStringValue = someStringValue ?: @""; –  Dave DeLong Jan 5 '13 at 18:35
    
Thank you, Eric. This is what I was hoping for. @Dave DeLong, thank you as well for streamlining it, I ultimately went with your implementation. –  alan Jan 5 '13 at 18:39
1  
@DaveDeLong My experience was JavaScript has taught me to avoid apocryphal operators. Even if I know what it is, my teammates probably won't and I'd rather it be immediately obvious. That having been said, +1 for the awesome tip. I had been missing the old a = b || c notation and that's just what I've been looking for. –  Eric Jan 5 '13 at 18:46
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If someStringValue is a class variable, you could add this code to your .m file that owns the string

- (void)setSomeStringValue:(NSString *)newSomeStringValue
{
   if (!newSomeStringValue) newSomeStringValue = @"";
   _someStringValue = newSomeStringValue;
}
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