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Suppose that I have an (unsorted in any way) array:

[ 12 64 35 ]
[ 95 89 95 ]
[ 32 54 09 ]
[ 87 56 12 ]

I want to sort it so that the second column is in ascending order:

[ 32 54 09 ]
[ 87 56 12 ]
[ 12 64 35 ]
[ 95 89 95 ]

Here are the ways that I thought about dealing with this:

  1. Make each [ x y z ] value into a list, and correlate each xyz value with an identifier, whose property is the y-value of the xyz value. Then, sort the identifiers. (I'm not sure if sorting Java arrays keeps the corresponding values in that row)

  2. Use a hashmap to do the same thing as the previous

However, the above 2 methods are obviously somewhat wasteful and complicated since they rely on an external identifier value which is unneeded, so is there a simpler, faster, and more elegant way to do this?

Sorry if this is a dumb question, I'm not familiar at all with the way that Java sorts arrays.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a one-liner (if you count an anonymous class as one line), making use of Arrays.sort() and a suitably typed and coded Comparator:

Arrays.sort(grid, new Comparator<int[]>() {
    public int compare(int[] o1, int[] o2) {
        return o1[1] - o2[1];
    }
});

Note the simple comparison expression o1[1] - o2[1] - no need to unbox to Integer and use Integer.compareTo().

Here's a test with your data:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[][] grid = new int[][] { 
        { 12, 64, 35 },
        { 95, 89, 95 },
        { 32, 54,  9 },
        { 87, 56, 12 }};
    Arrays.sort(grid, new Comparator<int[]>() {
        public int compare(int[] o1, int[] o2) {
            return o1[1] - o2[1];
        }
    });
    System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(grid).replace("],", "],\n"));
}

Output:

[[32, 54, 9],
 [87, 56, 12],
 [12, 64, 35],
 [95, 89, 95]]



Just for fun, here it is literally as one line:

Arrays.sort(grid, new Comparator<int[]>() {public int compare(int[] o1, int[] o2) {return o1[1] - o2[1];}});
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Thanks for doing my code for me! –  vemacs Jan 5 '13 at 19:28
1  
@vemacs and yet you accept the fastest gun in the west instead (or was that sarcasm?) –  Jan Dvorak Jan 5 '13 at 19:29
    
and make sure if you use x-y as compare function, there are no negative values to cause overflow... or it'd be a rookie mistake (hard to catch one at that) –  bestsss Jan 8 '13 at 17:22
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Easiest and most cleanest way would be to write a small comparator class. That will give you more flexibility in controlling the behavior of sorting also; for example you can sort 1st element or any element of arrays.

Comparator will be something like:

new Comparator(){

            public int compare ( Integer[] obj1, Integer[] obj2)
            {
                return obj1[1].compareTo(obj2[1]); 
            }
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Will try to write the comparator and post it here for ease. –  Deepak Jan 5 '13 at 19:14
    
So sorting values in an array doesn't retain the row data? Alright, I'll look into that. –  vemacs Jan 5 '13 at 19:18
1  
Note that although the sentiment of the answer is correct, this Comparator code won't actually work: It has the wrong type - arrays of primitive are not automatically unboxed to arrays of wrapper. –  Bohemian Jan 5 '13 at 19:33
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Use a custom comparator.

This implementation is more generic in that you can use it for any Comparable type and for any sorting index. If you also need a custom comparator for the T type itself, you'll need to pass that in the constructor and replace the .compareTo() call.

public class ArrayElementComparator<T implements Comparable<? super T>> implements Comparator<T[]> {

    private final int sortIndex;

    public ArrayElementComparator(int sortIndex) {
        this.sortIndex = sortIndex;
    }

    @Override
    public int compare(T[] left, T[] right) {
        // Optional: null checks and boundary checks
        if (left == null && right == null) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (left == null || left.length <= sortIndex) {
            return 1;
        }
        if (right == null || right.length <= sortIndex) {
            return -1;
        }
        return left[sortIndex].compareTo(right[sortIndex]);
    }

}

Usage:

List<Integer[]> list = new List<Integer[]>();
// ... Add records
Collections.sort(list, new ArrayElementComparator<Integer>(1));
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1  
I don't think it's really neccessary to account for null rows. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 5 '13 at 19:23
1  
@JanDvorak Probably not. What the heck, better safe than sorry. :P –  Mattias Buelens Jan 5 '13 at 19:25
    
I can see your intention was to create a utility class instead of a one-use anonymous class. Points for that - might be useful. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 5 '13 at 19:25
    
@Jan, anon. classes are pretty much the same as regular ones except they have compiler picked name (usually outerClass$num) and the latter sucks when you wish to trace memory leaks as the histogram is quite unclear. Anon. classes are also prone to create leaks in idioms like addListener(new Listener(){}) as the added listener cannot be removed. –  bestsss Jan 8 '13 at 22:45
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If these three values represent (x, y, z) coordinates in a 3D Euclidean space, you could write a class to hold them. Then use a List or array of these points and a customer Comparator to sort them the way you wish.

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Yeah, a comparator seems to be the proper way to sort these values. –  vemacs Jan 5 '13 at 19:19
2  
@vemacs Let me emphasize that the key difference between my answer and others given here is that I suggest that you also should create a custom class to hold the data being sorted rather than sorting a List (or array) of Lists (or arrays). –  Code-Apprentice Jan 5 '13 at 19:24
    
@Code-Guru you're also making at assumtion on the semantics of the asker's data. That assumption might or might not be true. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 5 '13 at 19:27
    
@JanDvorak The "if" at the beginning of my answer qualifies that assumption. No matter the exact semantics of the OP's data, my suggestion to write a custom class to make those semantics clear is still valid. –  Code-Apprentice Jan 5 '13 at 19:29
    
@Code-Guru If the semantics is a matrix of values, then this is the proper representation ;-) –  Jan Dvorak Jan 5 '13 at 19:30
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