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I can't seem to figure out whey the code below does not expose demovar to the decorated function:

def exposebasevar(function):
    def decorator(*args, **kwargs):
        demovar = 'Where am I?' # => or MyThreadSafeObjectHandle()
        return function(*args, **kwargs)
    return decorator

@exposebasevar
def usesexposedvariable():
    print demovar # this line will give an error

usesexposedvariable()

Background: I have a module with one global var that is used in each and every function. Now i want to make that threadsafe so I figured making this var available through a decorator. Then in the decorator I can figure out which instance of the object belongs to a thread and pass that in. That way I don't need to change the signature or content for each and every function.

Does anybody know how to set this up? Thanks.

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1  
Welcome to StackOverflow! Why would you expect this code to make demovar available to the function? Why not just pass demovar as an argument to the function? –  David Robinson Jan 5 '13 at 19:25
    
It's worth noting that wherever you do this kind of wrapping, it's a good idea to use functools.wraps(). –  Lattyware Jan 5 '13 at 22:10

3 Answers 3

That would be dynamic scoping. Widely considered a very bad idea, and hence not supported at all in a wide variety of languages including Python. Just not possible, unless you want to pull very dirty and fragile hacks. I'm actually including this as standard disclaimer, not because I have any such solution in mind. The closest to "working" I could offer would be re-writing the bytecode, ugh.

Instead, make it a parameter of the decorated function. Or get rid of the global wholesale, which would probably be simpler and better in the long run.

def exposebasevar(function):
    def decorator(*args, **kwargs):
        demovar = 'Where am I?'
        return function(*args, demovar=demovar, **kwargs)  # <<
    return decorator

@exposebasevar
def usesexposedvariable(demovar):  # <<
    print demovar
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I understand it´s kind of hacky... Then again when each and every function in each and ever file needs a first parameter to pass the scope something tells me that should be automated. –  user1951656 Jan 5 '13 at 20:23
    
@user1951656 Yeah, you can automate tjat. With sed or a refactoring tool ;-) Which has the added benefits that it incurs no runtime cost and isn't magic that has to be deciphered to understand the code. –  delnan Jan 5 '13 at 20:34

Your code doesn't work for exactly the same reason the following doesn't work:

def f():
  print v   # NameError: global name 'v' is not defined

def g():
  v = 42
  f()

g()

The cleanest way is perhaps to pass demovar as an argument to function:

def exposebasevar(function):
    def decorator(*args, **kwargs):
        demovar = 'Where am I?' # => or MyThreadSafeObjectHandle()
        return function(*args, demovar=demovar, **kwargs)
    return decorator

@exposebasevar
def usesexposedvariable(demovar):
    print demovar # this line will give an error

usesexposedvariable()
share|improve this answer

I have a module with one global var that is used in each and every function. Now i want to make that threadsafe ...

what you're describing is basically the purpose of threading.local; unfortunately, you'll likely have to change your code a little to make it work, the problem being that the thread-local object is not itself thread-local; only its attributes are. So long as your always using attributes of the thread local object, it's nearly transparent:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll use the method of the Flask framework, making the global var a proxy-object to the real object, imposing as the real object, then doing a quick sneaky lookup for the proxied object on each access, using a dict based on thread id. Somehow this give me also a very hacky-workaround feeling... Basically the only 'non hacky' way is to just pass te parameter (eg 'request') to each and every request handler, which is very workable. It's just a bit ... un elegant... I wish I could automate that or pass it to the functions ´globals´ on function access somehow. Other idea still welcome :) –  user1951656 Jan 5 '13 at 20:44
1  
that's exactly what threading.local does! –  IfLoop Jan 5 '13 at 21:09

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