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I have a web service layer that is written in Java/Jersey, and it serves JSON.

For the front-end of the application, I want to use Rails.

How should I go about building my models?

Should I do something like this?

response = api_client.get_user(123)

User user = User.new(response)

What is the best approach to mapping the JSON to the Ruby object?

What options do I have? Since this is a critical part, I want to know my options, because performance is a factor. This, along with mapping JSON to a Ruby object and going from Ruby object => JSON, is a common occurance in the application.

Would I still be able to make use of validations? Or wouldn't it make sense since I would have validation duplicated on the front-end and the service layer?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Models in Rails do not have to do database operation, they are just normal classes. Normally they are imbued with ActiveRecord magic when you subclass them from ActiveRecord::Base.

You can use a gem such as Virtus that will give you models with attributes. And for validations you can go with Vanguard. If you want something close to ActiveRecord but without the database and are running Rails 3+ you can also include ActiveModel into your model to get attributes and validations as well as have them working in forms. See Yehuda Katz's post for details on that.

In your case it will depend on the data you will consume. If all the datasources have the same basic format for example you could create your own base class to keep all the logic that you want to share across the individual classes (inheritance).

If you have a few different types of data coming in you could create modules to encapsulate behavior for the different types and include the models you need in the appropriate classes (composition).

Generally though you probably want to end up with one class per resource in the remote API that maps 1-to-1 with whatever domain logic you have. You can do this in many different ways, but following the method naming used by ActiveRecord might be a good idea, both since you learn ActiveRecord while building your class structure and it will help other Rails developers later if your API looks and works like ActiveRecords.

Think about it in terms of what you want to be able to do to an object (this is where TDD comes in). You want to be able to fetch a collection Model.all, a specific element Model.find(identifier), push a changed element to the remote service updated_model.save and so on.

What the actual logic on the inside of these methods will have to be will depend on the remote service. But you will probably want each model class to hold a url to it's resource endpoint and you will defiantly want to keep the logic in your models. So instead of:

response = api_client.get_user(123)

User user = User.new(response)

you will do

class User
  ...
  def find id
    @api_client.get_user(id)
  end
  ...
end

User.find(123)

or more probably

class ApiClient
  ...
  protected

  def self.uri resource_uri
    @uri = resource_uri
  end

  def get id
    # basically whatever code you envisioned for api_client.get_user
  end
  ...
end

class User < ApiClient
  uri 'http://path.to.remote/resource.json'
  ...
  def find id
    get(id)
  end
  ...
end

User.find(123)

Basic principles: Collect all the shared logic in a class (ApiClient). Subclass that on a per resource basis (User). Keep all the logic in your models, no other part of your system should have to know if it's a DB backed app or if you are using an external REST API. Best of all is if you can keep the integration logic completely in the base class. That way you have only one place to update if the external datasource changes.

As for going the other way, Rails have several good methods to convert objects to JSON. From the to_json method to using a gem such as RABL to have actual views for your JSON objects.

You can get validations by using part of the ActiveRecord modules. As of Rails 4 this is a module called ActiveModel, but you can do it in Rails 3 and there are several tutorials for it online, not least of all a RailsCast.

Performance will not be a problem except what you can incur when calling a remote service, if the network is slow you will be to. Some of that could probably be helped with caching (see another answer by me for details) but that is also dependent on the data you are using.

Hope that put you on the right track. And if you want a more thorough grounding in how to design these kind of structures you should pick up a book on the subject, for example Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby: An Agile Primer by Sandi Metz.

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