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... that is the question. I have been working on an algorithm which takes an array of vectors as input, and part of the algorithm repeatedly picks pairs of vectors and evaluates a function of these two vectors, which doesn't change over time. Looking at ways to optimize the algorithm, I thought this would be a good case for memoization: instead of recomputing the same function value over and over again, cache it lazily and hit the cache.

Before jumping to code, here is the gist of my question: the benefits I get from memoization depend on the number of vectors, which I think is inversely related to number of repeated calls, and in some circumstances memoization completely degrades performance. So is my situation inadequate for memoization? Am I doing something wrong, and are there smarter ways to optimize for my situation?

Here is a simplified test script, which is fairly close to the real thing:

open System
open System.Diagnostics
open System.Collections.Generic

let size = 10 // observations
let dim = 10 // features per observation
let runs = 10000000 // number of function calls

let rng = new Random()
let clock = new Stopwatch()

let data =
    [| for i in 1 .. size ->
        [ for j in 1 .. dim -> rng.NextDouble() ] |]    
let testPairs = [| for i in 1 .. runs -> rng.Next(size), rng.Next(size) |]

let f v1 v2 = List.fold2 (fun acc x y -> acc + (x-y) * (x-y)) 0.0 v1 v2

printfn "Raw"
clock.Restart()
testPairs |> Array.averageBy (fun (i, j) -> f data.[i] data.[j]) |> printfn "Check: %f"
printfn "Raw: %i" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds

I create a list of random vectors (data), a random collection of indexes (testPairs), and run f on each of the pairs.

Here is the memoized version:

let memoized =
    let cache = new Dictionary<(int*int),float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
    fun key ->
        match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
        | true, v  -> v
        | false, _ ->
            let v = f data.[fst key] data.[snd key]
            cache.Add(key, v)
            v

printfn "Memoized"
clock.Restart()
testPairs |> Array.averageBy (fun (i, j) -> memoized (i, j)) |> printfn "Check: %f"
printfn "Memoized: %i" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds

Here is what I am observing: * when size is small (10), memoization goes about twice as fast as the raw version, * when size is large (1000), memoization take 15x more time than raw version, * when f is costly, memoization improves things

My interpretation is that when the size is small, we have more repeat computations, and the cache pays off.

What surprised me was the huge performance hit for larger sizes, and I am not certain what is causing it. I know I could improve the dictionary access a bit, with a struct key for instance - but I didn't expect the "naive" version to behave so poorly.

So - is there something obviously wrong with what I am doing? Is memoization the wrong approach for my situation, and if yes, is there a better approach?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think memoization is a useful technique, but it is not a silver bullet. It is very useful in dynamic programming where it reduces the (theoretical) complexity of the algorithm. As an optimization, it can (as you would probably expect) have varying results.

In your case, the cache is certainly more useful when the number of observations is smaller (and f is more expensive computation). You can add simple statistics to your memoization:

let stats = ref (0, 0) // Count number of cache misses & hits
let memoized =
    let cache = new Dictionary<(int*int),float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
    fun key ->
        let (mis, hit) = !stats
        match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
        | true, v  -> stats := (mis, hit + 1); v // Increment hit count
        | false, _ ->
            stats := (mis + 1, hit); // Increment miss count
            let v = f data.[fst key] data.[snd key]
            cache.Add(key, v)
            v
  • For small size, the numbers I get are something like (100, 999900) so there is a huge benefit from memoization - the function f is computed 100x and then each result is reused 9999x.

  • For big size, I get something like (632331, 1367669) so f is called many times and each result is reused just twice. In that case, the overhead with allocation and lookup in the (big) hash table is much bigger.

As a minor optimization, you can pre-allocate the Dictionary and write new Dictionary<_, _>(10000,HashIdentity.Structural), but that does not seem to help much in this case.

To make this optimization efficient, I think you would need to know some more information about the memoized function. In your example, the inputs are quite regular, so there is porbably no point in memoization, but if you know that the function is more often called with some values of arguments, you can perhaps only memoize only for these common arguments.

share|improve this answer

Tomas's answer is great for when you should use memoization. Here's why memoization is going so slow in your case.

It sounds like you're testing in Debug mode. Run your test again in Release and you should get a faster result for memoization. Tuples can cause a large performance hit while in Debug mode. I added a hashed version for comparison along with some micro optimizations.

Release

Raw
Check: 1.441687
Raw: 894

Memoized
Check: 1.441687
Memoized: 733

memoizedHash
Check: 1.441687
memoizedHash: 552

memoizedHashInline
Check: 1.441687
memoizedHashInline: 493

memoizedHashInline2
Check: 1.441687
memoizedHashInline2: 385

Debug

Raw
Check: 1.409310
Raw: 797

Memoized
Check: 1.409310
Memoized: 5190

memoizedHash
Check: 1.409310
memoizedHash: 593

memoizedHashInline
Check: 1.409310
memoizedHashInline: 497

memoizedHashInline2
Check: 1.409310
memoizedHashInline2: 373

Source

open System
open System.Diagnostics
open System.Collections.Generic

let size = 10 // observations
let dim = 10 // features per observation
let runs = 10000000 // number of function calls

let rng = new Random()
let clock = new Stopwatch()

let data =
    [| for i in 1 .. size ->
        [ for j in 1 .. dim -> rng.NextDouble() ] |]    
let testPairs = [| for i in 1 .. runs -> rng.Next(size), rng.Next(size) |]

let f v1 v2 = List.fold2 (fun acc x y -> acc + (x-y) * (x-y)) 0.0 v1 v2

printfn "Raw"
clock.Restart()
testPairs |> Array.averageBy (fun (i, j) -> f data.[i] data.[j]) |> printfn "Check: %f"
printfn "Raw: %i\n" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds


let memoized =
    let cache = new Dictionary<(int*int),float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
    fun key ->
        match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
        | true, v  -> v
        | false, _ ->
            let v = f data.[fst key] data.[snd key]
            cache.Add(key, v)
            v

printfn "Memoized"
clock.Restart()
testPairs |> Array.averageBy (fun (i, j) -> memoized (i, j)) |> printfn "Check: %f"
printfn "Memoized: %i\n" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds


let memoizedHash =
    let cache = new Dictionary<int,float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
    fun key ->
        match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
        | true, v  -> v
        | false, _ ->
            let i = key / size
            let j = key % size
            let v = f data.[i] data.[j]
            cache.Add(key, v)
            v

printfn "memoizedHash"
clock.Restart()
testPairs |> Array.averageBy (fun (i, j) -> memoizedHash (i * size + j)) |> printfn "Check: %f"
printfn "memoizedHash: %i\n" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds



let memoizedHashInline =
    let cache = new Dictionary<int,float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
    fun key ->
        match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
        | true, v  -> v
        | false, _ ->
            let i = key / size
            let j = key % size
            let v = f data.[i] data.[j]
            cache.Add(key, v)
            v

printfn "memoizedHashInline"
clock.Restart()
let mutable total = 0.0
for i, j in testPairs do
    total <- total + memoizedHashInline (i * size + j)
printfn "Check: %f" (total / float testPairs.Length)
printfn "memoizedHashInline: %i\n" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds


printfn "memoizedHashInline2"
clock.Restart()
let mutable total2 = 0.0
let cache = new Dictionary<int,float>(HashIdentity.Structural)
for i, j in testPairs do
    let key = (i * size + j)
    match cache.TryGetValue(key) with
    | true, v  -> total2 <- total2 + v
    | false, _ ->
        let i = key / size
        let j = key % size
        let v = f data.[i] data.[j]
        cache.Add(key, v)
        total2 <- total2 + v

printfn "Check: %f" (total2 / float testPairs.Length)
printfn "memoizedHashInline2: %i\n" clock.ElapsedMilliseconds



Console.ReadLine() |> ignore
share|improve this answer
2  
If you hash testPairs and directly use them in the dictionary lookup, it saves another 20%. –  gradbot Jan 6 '13 at 0:20
    
I like what you did with the key reduction to a single int, it's a simple but nice idea. The debug vs. release is a great point, and explains some of the weird results I had observed earlier. Is there a good reason why a dictionary access in release would be so much more efficient? –  Mathias Jan 10 '13 at 4:53

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