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My MySQL query is for a report, so I want to number each row. In other words, I want to add a field like "rank" and the first row will be 1, the second 2, etc.

I've seen this done using a subquery here and here. Judging from the comments, this method seems correct, but it doesn't work for my specific query. I believe it is because I have several JOINs, but I'm not sure. I can get the query to run without error, but when I add the row numbers exactly as instructed in the above posts, the "rank" column is out of order.

Here is my original query, without the ranks added:

SELECT wsat_ib.user_id, wpjb_resume.id resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstname, wpjb_resume.lastname, wsat_ib.overall_score, wsat_ib.account_score, wsat_ib.econ_score, wsat_ib.math_score, wsat_ib.logic_score, wsat_ib.fsanaly_score, wsat_ib.corpval_score, wsat_ib.end_time, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT wp_usermeta.meta_value) AS target_employers, wpjb_field_value.value AS school, GROUP_CONCAT(wpjb_application.job_id) AS applications FROM  `wsat_ib` 
    LEFT JOIN wp_usermeta ON wsat_ib.user_id = wp_usermeta.user_id
    LEFT JOIN wpjb_resume ON wsat_ib.user_id = wpjb_resume.user_id
    LEFT JOIN wpjb_field_value ON wpjb_resume.id=wpjb_field_value.job_id AND wpjb_field_value.field_id=3
    LEFT JOIN wpjb_application ON wpjb_application.user_id = wsat_ib.user_id 
    WHERE (wp_usermeta.meta_key = 'target_employer' AND (wp_usermeta.meta_value = 'public' OR wp_usermeta.meta_value=2) AND wpjb_resume.is_active =1)
    GROUP BY wsat_ib.user_id, resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstname, wpjb_resume.lastname, wsat_ib.overall_score, wsat_ib.account_score, wsat_ib.econ_score, wsat_ib.math_score, wsat_ib.logic_score, wsat_ib.fsanaly_score, wsat_ib.corpval_score, wsat_ib.end_time, wpjb_field_value.value
     ORDER BY end_time DESC LIMIT 0, 20

Here is my unsuccessful attempt to add the rank field:

SELECT @row := @row + 1 as row, wsat_ib.user_id, wpjb_resume.id resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstname, wpjb_resume.lastname, wsat_ib.overall_score, wsat_ib.account_score, wsat_ib.econ_score, wsat_ib.math_score, wsat_ib.logic_score, wsat_ib.fsanaly_score, wsat_ib.corpval_score, wsat_ib.end_time, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT wp_usermeta.meta_value) AS target_employers, wpjb_field_value.value AS school, GROUP_CONCAT(wpjb_application.job_id) AS applications FROM (SELECT @row := 0) r, `wsat_ib` 
LEFT JOIN wp_usermeta ON wsat_ib.user_id = wp_usermeta.user_id
LEFT JOIN wpjb_resume ON wsat_ib.user_id = wpjb_resume.user_id
LEFT JOIN wpjb_field_value ON wpjb_resume.id=wpjb_field_value.job_id AND wpjb_field_value.field_id=3
LEFT JOIN wpjb_application ON wpjb_application.user_id = wsat_ib.user_id 
WHERE (wp_usermeta.meta_key = 'target_employer' AND (wp_usermeta.meta_value = 'public' OR wp_usermeta.meta_value=2) AND wpjb_resume.is_active =1)
GROUP BY wsat_ib.user_id, resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstnam[...]

The query runs without error, but the rank column is not 1, 2, 3, 4... Instead it's: 496,498,497,499...

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your row numbers are not as you expect because your SQL query has a GROUP BY clause in it. The SELECT line is evaluated on each row before it is grouped.

To solve your problem you can use a nested query, e.g.:

SELECT *, @row := @row + 1 AS row FROM (SELECT ...) AS t;

Your query that you provided would then be:

SELECT *, @row := @row + 1 AS row FROM (
    SELECT wsat_ib.user_id, wpjb_resume.id resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstname, wpjb_resume.lastname, wsat_ib.overall_score, wsat_ib.account_score, wsat_ib.econ_score, wsat_ib.math_score, wsat_ib.logic_score, wsat_ib.fsanaly_score, wsat_ib.corpval_score, wsat_ib.end_time, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT wp_usermeta.meta_value) AS target_employers, wpjb_field_value.value AS school, GROUP_CONCAT(wpjb_application.job_id) AS applications FROM  `wsat_ib`
        LEFT JOIN wp_usermeta ON wsat_ib.user_id = wp_usermeta.user_id
        LEFT JOIN wpjb_resume ON wsat_ib.user_id = wpjb_resume.user_id
        LEFT JOIN wpjb_field_value ON wpjb_resume.id=wpjb_field_value.job_id AND wpjb_field_value.field_id=3
        LEFT JOIN wpjb_application ON wpjb_application.user_id = wsat_ib.user_id
        WHERE (wp_usermeta.meta_key = 'target_employer' AND (wp_usermeta.meta_value = 'public' OR wp_usermeta.meta_value=2) AND wpjb_resume.is_active =1)
        GROUP BY wsat_ib.user_id, resume_id, wpjb_resume.firstname, wpjb_resume.lastname, wsat_ib.overall_score, wsat_ib.account_score, wsat_ib.econ_score, wsat_ib.math_score, wsat_ib.logic_score, wsat_ib.fsanaly_score, wsat_ib.corpval_score, wsat_ib.end_time, wpjb_field_value.value
        ORDER BY end_time DESC LIMIT 0, 20) AS t
  CROSS JOIN
    (SELECT @row := 0) AS r 
ORDER BY end_time DESC ;
share|improve this answer
    
I think you need to add the ORDER BY end_time DESC in the external query, too. Just to be sure that the order is preserved. –  ypercube Jan 5 '13 at 22:48
    
I see. This is helpful. But I wonder... the reason I started trying to do this was for performance reasons, to avoid having to loop through the results and assign the rank number afterwards. If my query gets to the point where there are several subqueries, do you think it's still worth trying to do it in MySQL rather then with PHP afterwards? –  SDP Jan 5 '13 at 23:00
    
I don't think that this would change the query performance in a significant way. I think though that you might be better off doing the numbering in PHP just for reasons of clarity. –  Don Cruickshank Jan 5 '13 at 23:04

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