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In my Rails app, I have two custom Rake Tasks running every 30 minutes. Task A scrapes hourly prices from the internet and saves them to a database as HourlyPrice. Task B goes into the db, takes hourly prices from each day for the last seven days, and averages them to create a new DailyAveragePrice record in a separate DB Table.

However, when running Task B, the last day's (of the seven) average price is incorrect.

After fiddling with the hourly prices of that day in an Excel spreadsheet, I see that the average price Task B is generating is the result of taking only the last three hours and averaging them.

Task B is mostly done with this single query:

averages = HourlyPrice.where('date >= ?', 7.days.ago).average(:price, :group => "DATE_TRUNC('day', date - INTERVAL '1 hour')")

I can't figure out why this is happening?

Clues

  1. HourlyPrice has two attributes (datetime,price). Each HourlyPrice actually represents a price for the previous hour. So, source data lists a 24:00:00 price for each day which PostgreSQL does not want to import as is into a datetime column. Instead, it converts all 24:00:00 prices to 00:00:00 of the next day. To make up for this, I've tried to subtract an hour interval, as you can see in the query. Is this causing the problem?
  2. My ActiveRecord's time zone is currently set to 'Mountain Time (US & Canada)'. That is where the price exchange is located. I have not adjusted my PostgreSQL DB's timezone, and I believe it defaults to UTC. When running Task B, I noticed that it was 9:20PM UTC, leaving three hours left in the UTC day, which might explain the averaging of only three HourlyPrices of the last of the seven days. I'll try running Task B again in the next hour to see if it will average only two hours. Update to come... Is this timezone conflict causing a problem, or is what I am doing insulated from timezones since I have my own date columns?

UPDATE - Problem identified, but how to fix? Clue #2 is correct. It is a timezone issue. I just ran Task B again (an hour later, with 2 hours left until UTC day change), and it only averages two HourlyPrices now for the last of the seven days.

How can I fix my query above to average ONLY if there are 24 HourlyPrice records available?

share|improve this question
    
What type is date and why are you making a one hour adjustment to it? –  mu is too short Jan 5 '13 at 23:07
    
date is datetime. Each HourlyPrice actually represents a price for the previous hour. So, source data lists a 24:00:00 price for each day which PostgreSQL does not want to import as is into a datetime column. Instead, it converts all 24:00:00 prices to 00:00:00 of the next day. To make up for this, I've tried to subtract an hour interval, as you can see in the query. –  ac360 Jan 5 '13 at 23:33
    
Again, why don't you fix the 24:00:00 to be 00:00:00 while importing? And why use a timestamp when you really want a date? –  mu is too short Jan 5 '13 at 23:41
1  
So, add a timezone indication to the timestamp when you import it? Postgres understands time zones. postgresql.org/docs/9.2/interactive/… –  Andrew Lazarus Jan 6 '13 at 1:27

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