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Suppose given a function (it's part of an object, don't worry)

makeClosures : function(arr, fn) {},

where the parameters are, first, an array e.g. [1, 2, 3, 4] and second, a function (call it doSomeStuff) which squares a given number

var doSomeStuff = function (x) { return x * x; }

makeClosures is supposed to return an array same size as arr, where each element contains a reference to a function that basically calls doSomeStuff.

So here's my implementation:

makeClosures : function(arr, fn) {
  var funcs = [];

  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    var f = function() {
      return fn(arr[i]);
    };

    funcs.push(f);
  }

  return funcs;
},

and the question is:

When I run my program, the return value of f is NaN. I tried with actual numbers (return fn[1], return fn(arr[0])) then it worked, which means the problem is on arr[i] (undefined?). I suspect the inner function f doesn't see the loop index i. Why?

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3  
In JavaScript, lexical scoping happens at the function level. All of your functions constructed in the loop share the same variable "i". At the end of the loop, what's the value of "i"? Right: arr.length. What's the value of arr[arr.length]? –  Pointy Jan 5 '13 at 21:57
    
What Pointy said. Create a function generator, passing in the current value of i, instead. –  Dave Newton Jan 5 '13 at 22:00
1  
This question has been answered soooo many times...Search on SO you'll find the answer. –  elclanrs Jan 5 '13 at 22:01
    
right on, thanks guys! –  user898871 Jan 5 '13 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Pointy's comment:

"In JavaScript, lexical scoping happens at the function level. All of your functions constructed in the loop share the same variable "i". At the end of the loop, what's the value of "i"? Right: arr.length. What's the value of arr[arr.length]?"

The returned functions are executed after the loop iteration, and var i is still in scope with the value of array.length, which is out of bounds of the array.

Also, you should declare f outside of the for loop, scopes are created at the function level, not inside loops, so you are declaring f when it already exists each iteration of the loop.

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Not sure weather this will help, but this is what I tried and worked.

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 4]
var fn = function (x) { return x * x; }

function makeClosures(arr, fn) {
    var funcs = [];   

    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {     

        var f =  fn(arr[i]);       

        funcs.push(f);
    }

    return funcs;
}

myarr = makeClosures(arr, fn);

for (var j = 0; j < myarr.length; j++) {
    alert(arr[j] + ' square is : ' + myarr[j]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
please note that funcs should contain the reference to functions instead of their return values. I've worked out my solution though, thanks for the help. –  user898871 Jan 5 '13 at 22:39
    
This is wrong because you create an array of values, not functions. No closures in sight! –  ErikE Jan 5 '13 at 22:40

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