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I need some help constructing the proper structure for an HTML email that I am trying to send using PHP. Here is the line which sends the email:

$this->_send_user_email($recipient, $subject, $message);

Where I am having trouble is constructing the $message. I need the $message to include a table with a dynamic number of rows. Here is the current structure of the $message variable:

$message = "Hello, <br><br> 
Please review details in the table below:
<br><br>
**** NEED TO INSERT DYNAMIC PHP TABLE HERE ****
<br><br>
If you have questions, please call 1-888-888-8888 and we will assist you.
<br><br>
Customer Support<br> 
<br><br>
";  

I am unsure of how to insert my PHP foreach loop inside this existing $messsage variable. I get confused about when to close the quotes and how to continue etc. Here is the code for the foreach loop that I am trying to insert:

<?php if (is_array($foo['bar'])):  ?>    
<table>
    <tr>
        <th >1</th>
        <th >2</th>
        <th >3</th>
    </tr>
<?php $row = 01; 
foreach ($foo['bar'] as $key => $value): ?>
<tr>
    <td ><?php echo str_pad($row++, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT); ?></td>
    <td >AAA</td>
    <td >BBB</td>
</tr>
<?php endforeach; ?>
</table>
<?php endif; ?>

So I guess my question is: What is the correct way to insert this PHP foreach loop into the $message variable above?

share|improve this question
    
Additionally to following some of the advice in the given answers, you should really try to completely take your markup (HTML) and your PHP apart from each other! –  markus Jan 5 '13 at 22:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A way of doing this is splitting the template message in two strings say $message1 and $message2 where the first contains everything up until the dynamic table and the latter everything that starts after the table. Then you generate your dynamic table with string concatenation and you concatenate the three parts of the whole message.

$message1 = "Hello, <br><br> 
Please review details in the table below:
<br><br>";

$message2 = "<br><br>
If you have questions, please call 1-888-888-8888 and we will assist you.
<br><br>
Customer Support<br> 
<br><br>";

$row = "01";

$table = "";

if(is_array($foo['bar'])) {   

    $table .= "<table>
                <tr>
                    <th >1</th>
                    <th >2</th>
                    <th >3</th>
                </tr>"; 

    foreach($foo['bar'] as $key => $value) {
        $table .= "<tr>
                     <td >" . str_pad($row++, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT) . "</td>
                     <td >AAA</td>
                     <td >BBB</td>
                   </tr>";
    }

    $table .= "</table>";
}

$message = $message1 . $table. $message2;

Now as someone mentioned in the comments, this code will work but is quite messy, in the sense that you heavily mix php logic and plain html text. Ideally you want to separate these two as much as possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your helpful explanation. I'm going to give this a shot when I get home. Really appreciate it. –  DanielAttard Jan 5 '13 at 22:33
    
what do you mean by "generate your dynamic table with string concatenation"? –  DanielAttard Jan 6 '13 at 0:50

You are able to create a static HTML message using php that is sent to your user, however you can NOT include php within your email(if that's what you're trying to do) so that the email is dynamic as it is displayed. So assuming you're doing the former, the code in joe42s answer is spot on. he's written if for you!

if you want a dynamically updated email that changes when people look at it (using php), you could generate a link to be sent in the email with parameters in it that would display a webpage customized for the user.

share|improve this answer
            <?php 
            $message = "Hello, <br><br> 
            Please review details in the table below:
            <br><br>";

            if (is_array($foo['bar'])) {  
                $message .= "<table>
                    <tr>
                        <th >1</th>
                        <th >2</th>
                        <th >3</th>
                    </tr>";

                $row = 01; 
                foreach ($foo['bar'] as $key => $value) {
                    $message .= "<tr>
                        <td >".str_pad($row++, 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT)."</td>
                        <td >AAA</td>
                        <td >BBB</td>
                    </tr>";
                }
                $message .= "</table>";
            }

            $message .= "<br><br>
            If you have any questions, please call 1-888-888-8888 and we will be happy to assist you.
            <br><br>
            Customer Support<br> 
            <br><br>
            ";  
            ?>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks joe42, this looks great. I'm going to give this a shot when I get home. –  DanielAttard Jan 5 '13 at 22:34

Well, your way may work some way or another but i may advice with more proper way to send an email you can use view as message content, for example :

$data=$foo;
$message = $this->load->view('some view',$data,true);

and you can deal with it as normal view

share|improve this answer
    
You should really be passing $foo as an array element of $data, like so: $data = array('foo' => $foo); otherwise you will create a new variable for every index in $foo, opposed to just creating one variable called $foo in your view file. –  cryptic ツ Jan 6 '13 at 3:23

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