Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why am I getting a segmentation fault and how to fix it?

I am writing the code below to sort of recursively "traverse" through a maze and find total number of paths. I am using a stack to keep track of "next step".

ROWS and COLUMNS define the size of the maze. If I make those parameter greater than 9x9 I get a segmentation fault. I have no idea why I am getting that.

This is the first time I've used gdb and got the following:

#3  0x0000000000400de0 in std::stack<xy, std::deque<xy, std::allocator<xy> > >::top (this=0x604400 <buff>)
at /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/bits/stl_stack.h:161
161     return c.back();

Leading me to believe it has something to do with my stack.

I appreciate any help. Thanks.

The Code:

#define ROWS 10
#define COLUMNS 10

#include<iostream>
#include<stack>
using namespace std;

struct xy
{
  long i;
  long j;
};

stack<xy> buff;

long goRight (long j)
{
  if (j < COLUMNS-1)
    return 1;
  else
    return 0;
}

long goDown (long i)
{
  if (i < ROWS-1)
    return 1;  
  else
    return 0;
}

long traverse (xy POS)
{
  long fD = goDown(POS.i);
  long fR = goRight(POS.j);

  xy toAdd;

  if (fD == 1)
    {
      toAdd.i=POS.i+1;
      toAdd.j=POS.j;
      buff.push(toAdd);
    }

  if (fR == 1)
    {
      toAdd.i=POS.i;
      toAdd.j=POS.j+1;
      buff.push(toAdd);
    }

  if(buff.empty())
    return 0;

  toAdd = buff.top();
  buff.pop();

  return (traverse(toAdd) + (fD * fR));
}

int main()
{
  xy initial;
  initial.i=0;
  initial.j=0;

  cout << 1 + traverse(initial);

  return 1;
}
share|improve this question
4  
Why do you use recursion instead of iteration? – kmkaplan Jan 5 '13 at 22:26
    
There is no particular reason for using recursion. That solution occurred to me first - that is all. – lamdacore Jan 5 '13 at 22:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe you do not need an std::stack object to achieve what you want (i.e. count the number of paths). And you do not necessarily have to switch to iteration, which makes this algorithm harder to write, just simplify the algorithm and its termination conditions.

Here is a possible solution (btw, if you plan to go higher with the number of rows and columns, maybe consider switching to a long long to avoid integer - not stack - overflow):

#define ROWS 10
#define COLUMNS 10

#include<iostream>
#include <stack>

using namespace std;

struct xy
{
  long i;
  long j;
};

stack<xy> partialPath;

long goRight (long j)
{
  if (j < COLUMNS - 1)
    return 1;
  else
    return 0;
}

long goDown (long i)
{
  if (i < ROWS - 1)
    return 1;
  else
    return 0;
}

long traverse (xy const& POS)
{
    partialPath.push(POS); // Not needed to count the # of paths, but if you want...

    long fD = goDown(POS.i);
    long fR = goRight(POS.j);

    xy nextPos;
    long numOfPaths = 0;
    if (fD == 1)
    {
        nextPos.i=POS.i+1;
        nextPos.j=POS.j;
        numOfPaths += traverse(nextPos);
    }

    if (fR == 1)
    {
        nextPos.i=POS.i;
        nextPos.j=POS.j+1;
        numOfPaths += traverse(nextPos);
    }

    partialPath.pop(); // Not needed to count the # of paths, but if you want...

    if ((fD == 0) && (fR == 0))
    {
        return 1;
    }

    return numOfPaths;
}

int main()
{
  xy initial;
  initial.i=0;
  initial.j=0;

  cout << traverse(initial);

  return 0;
}

P.S: For further efficiency it is better to pass the POS argument by const ref. Also, I think the return code to use for indicating that your process succeeded should be 0 and not 1 (i mean in the return statement of main()).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the solution. Indeed, there was a much better way of doing it. – lamdacore Jan 5 '13 at 23:10
    
Anyway, with this solution you can still use your std::stack if you want to keep track of the path without running into segmentation fault. I will edit the solution to show you – Andy Prowl Jan 5 '13 at 23:12
    
@lamdacore: there you go. this said, it is true that an implementation based on iteration is going to be more efficient and more scalable, but i thought that "just do it otherwise" would not be a real answer to your question, as recursion can handle your cases pretty well and is the most elegant algorithm IMHO. – Andy Prowl Jan 5 '13 at 23:18
    
Indeed, I think the recursive algorithm is much more elegant. Thanks again for your help! – lamdacore Jan 5 '13 at 23:28

Your call stack has a limited amount of memory, and each function you call is using memory on that stack. Hence, bruteforcing recursively through a giant maze is going to end up in a stack overflow. Using gdb's backtrace function should show you that clearly.

You should reconsider your algorithm and use iterations instead of recursions. In your case, it seems like you want to implement some kind of a flood fill algorithm, which is easily doable with iterations as explained in this link.

Also note that if you're on a linux system, using ulimit -s unlimited will allow you to use an unlimited amount of memory for your call stack for all programs run from this terminal emulator. Your program should not segfault then.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Understood - I'll switch to iterations. Is there a possible way around this limit though? – lamdacore Jan 5 '13 at 22:42
    
haha, beat you to it! – cmc Jan 5 '13 at 22:44
    
@lamdacore Even if there is (there seems to be), you don't want to stick to recursion since this uses really much memory! Iteration is far better in this case. – leemes Jan 5 '13 at 22:44
    
I think it is not needed to switch to iteration, I just believe your algorithm is not correct – Andy Prowl Jan 5 '13 at 22:45
    
I did not check if his implementation of the flood fill algorithm is correct, but this is not an algorithm to be implemented recursively anyway. Note that his program doesn't segfault if executed with an unlimited stack, and it returns 48620. – cmc Jan 5 '13 at 22:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.