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From an PNG Image containing a transparent region and a colored region, I would like to generate a polygon with N sides (N being configurable) approximating the best possible edge of the image. I want this polygon to be defined by a series of vector.

For example, let consider the following image: + link to plus. I can manage to detect the edges of the image by counting, for each pixel, the number of transparent pixels around it. I get the following matrix:

0000000000000000
0000053335000000
0000030003000000
0000030003000000
0000020002000000
0533210001233500
0300000000000300
0300000000000300
0300000000000300
0533210001233500
0000020002000000
0000030003000000
0000030003000000
0000053335000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000

I think, based on this matrix, I should be able to get the coordinate of all the corners and therefore get the vectors, but I cannot figure out how. In this case, I would like my program to return:

[7,2]->[11,2]
[11,2]->[11,6]
[11,6]->[15,6]
... 

Do any of you have a suggestion or a link to do that?

Ultimately, I would also like the approximate angle other than 90 and 0, but that's really for a second stage.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you will find a number of tools in the CV toolkit can be of use to you. You'll do best to leverage these resources rather than roll your own solution.

The two features I think you'd be interested in extracting are edges and corners.

Edges, like what you were going for, can get you toward the outline of the shape. What you're probably not interested in right now are Edge Detection techniques. These will transform your image into a binary image of edge/space. Instead, you'll want to look into the Hough Transform which can give you end points for each of the lines in your image. If you are dealing with well defined, solid, straight lines as you seem to be, this should work quite well. You've tagged your question as Ruby so maybe you can take a look into OpenCV (OpenCV is written in C but there are ruby-opencv and javacv projects to bind). Here is the Hough Transform documentation for OpenCV. One thing you may find, however, is that the Hough transform doesn't give you lines which connect. This depends on the regularity/irregularity of the actual lines in your image. Because of this, you may need to manually connect the end points of the lines into a structure.

Corners, may work quite well for images such as the one you provided. The standard algorithm is Harris corner detection. Similar to the Hough transform, you can use this technique to return the 'most significant' features in the image. This technique is known for giving consistent results, even for different images of the same thing. As such, it's often used for pattern recognition and the like. However, if your images are as simple as the one provided, you may well be able to extract all of the shape's corners in this manner. Getting the shape of the image would then just be a matter of connecting the points in a meaningful way given your predefined N sides.

You should definitely play with both of these feature spaces and see how they work, and you could probably use both in concert for better results.

As an aside, if your image really is color/intensity on transparent you can convert your image to a 'binary image'. Note that this is not just binary data. Instead, it means you are only representing two colors, one represented by 0 and the other represented by 1. Doing so opens up a whole suite of tools that work on grayscale and binary images. For example, the matrix of numbers you calculated manually above is known as a distance transformation and can be done quite easily and efficiently using tools like OpenCV.

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The matrix shown is not the result of a distance transformation by any definition, that is a completely wrong statement. Now, another point: if he can get that matrix, there is no point in using Hough, Harris, etc. By accepting this question it is clear that the asker has no idea what he is after. – mmgp Jan 16 '13 at 15:05
    
My mother used to tell us "say something nice or don't say anything at all". eltados' matrix is not a standard distance transformation, no, that would be fortuitous. However, a distance transformation is just a concept one can expand on. I provided a link to eltados to follow up on the concept. Regarding 'another point', if he has that matrix, he still needs to transform it to a geometric representation. This is what his question asked. I suggested using standard, vetted, robust tools to do this more easily. Please contribute or don't, comments like this help nobody. – Sean Connolly Jan 16 '13 at 15:57
    
The reason my comment was added there is because I believe this answer is just side stepping the actual question. This generic answer could be copied and pasted to many other questions, which wouldn't help anyone. So my comment is a critic to generic answers, which points to some favorite-library to do some related task, which doesn't fully solve the question (which is a matter of ordering points after the matrix presented in the question is obtained). – mmgp Jan 16 '13 at 16:15
    
Then please, provide your own answer. A question isn't closed when an answer is accepted; 'Correct Answers' can be removed and reassigned to another. If you do have the correct answer, it will help nobody to present it as 'that is a completely wrong statement' on a comment. Cheers. – Sean Connolly Jan 16 '13 at 16:27
    
My answer is below yours with 0 votes, and I didn't say your answer is completely wrong (except for the distance transform part), it is just not fully appropriate for the question. I'm not claiming I have the uttermost true-only answer, but it solves what the question is asking. – mmgp Jan 16 '13 at 16:43

The Hough transform is a standard technique for finding lines, polygons, and other shapes given a set of points. It might exactly what you're looking for here. You could use the Hough transform to find all possible line segments in the image, then group nearby line segments together to get a set of polygons approximating the image.

Hope this helps!

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In such a simple situation you can do the following three steps: find the centroid of your shape, sort the points of interest based on the angle between the x axis and the line formed by the current point and the centroid, walk through the sorted points.

Given the situation, the x coordinate of the centroid is the sum of the x coordinates of each point of interest divided by the total number of points of interest (respectively for the y coord of centroid). To calculate the angles, it is a simple matter of using atan2 available in virtually any language. Your points of interest are those that are either presented as 1 or 5, otherwise it is not a corner (based on your input).

Do not be fooled that Hough will solve your question, i.e., it won't give the sorted coordinates you are after. It is also an expensive method. Also, given your matrix, you already have such perfect information that no other method will beat (the problem, of course, is repeating such good result as you presented -- in those occasions, Hough might prove useful).

My Ruby is quite bad, so take the following code as a guideline to your problem:

include Math

data = ["0000000000000000",
    "0000053335000000",
    "0000030003000000",
    "0000030003000000",
    "0000020002000000",
    "0533210001233500",
    "0300000000000300",
    "0300000000000300",
    "0300000000000300",
    "0533210001233500",
    "0000020002000000",
    "0000030003000000",
    "0000030003000000",
    "0000053335000000",
    "0000000000000000",
    "0000000000000000"]

corner_x = []
corner_y = []
data.each_with_index{|line, i|
    line.split(//).each_with_index{|col, j|
        if col == "1" || col == "5"
            # Cartesian coords.
            corner_x.push(j + 1)
            corner_y.push(data.length - i)
        end
    }
}

centroid_y = corner_y.reduce(:+)/corner_y.length.to_f
centroid_x = corner_x.reduce(:+)/corner_x.length.to_f

corner = []
corner_x.zip(corner_y).each{|c|
    dy = c[1] - centroid_y
    dx = c[0] - centroid_x
    theta = Math.atan2(dy, dx)
    corner.push([theta, c])
}

corner.sort!
corner.each_cons(2) {|c|
    puts "%s->%s" % [c[0][1].inspect, c[1][1].inspect]
}

This results in:

[2, 7]->[6, 7]
[6, 7]->[6, 3]
[6, 3]->[10, 3]
[10, 3]->[10, 7]
[10, 7]->[14, 7]
[14, 7]->[14, 11]
[14, 11]->[10, 11]
[10, 11]->[10, 15]
[10, 15]->[6, 15]
[6, 15]->[6, 11]
[6, 11]->[2, 11]

Which are your vertices in anti-clock-wise order starting with the bottom leftmost point (in cartesian coords starting in (1, 1) at left-bottom most position).

share|improve this answer
    
Clarifications (which the code already takes into account): 1) By ".. sort the points .. based on the angle between the x axis and the line formed by .." I mean the x axis crossing the centroid; 2) ".. starting with the bottom leftmost point .." means the leftmost point, but since there are two leftmost ones (at x = 2), the bottom most of them is picked. – mmgp Jan 7 '13 at 20:40

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