Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm fairly new to C++ and today I decided to sit down and understand how linked lists work. I'm having a lot of fun doing it so far, but I've encountered a problem when trying to print my linked list in reverse order (not reverse the order of the linked list!)

Also, I wanted to do this without having a double linked list:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class LinkedList
{
    public:
        LinkedList()
        {
            head = NULL;
        }

        void addItem(string x)
        {
            if(head == NULL)
            {
                head = new node();
                head->next = NULL;
                head->data = x;
            } else {
                node* temp = head;
                while(temp->next != NULL)
                    temp = temp->next;

                node* newNode = new node();
                newNode->data = x;
                newNode->next = NULL;
                temp->next = newNode;
            }
        }
        void printList()
        {
            node *temp = head;
            while(temp->next != NULL)
            {
                cout << temp->data << endl;
                temp = temp->next;
            }
            cout << temp->data << endl;
        }

        void addToHead(string x)
        {
            node *temp = head;
            head = new node;
            head->next = temp;
            head->data = x;
        }

        int countItems()
        {
            int count = 1;
            for(node* temp = head; temp->next != NULL; temp = temp->next)
                ++count;
            return count;
        }

        void printReverse()
        {
            node* temp2;
            node* temp = head;
            while(temp->next != NULL)
                temp = temp->next;

            //Print last node before we enter loop
            cout << temp->data << endl;

            for(double count = countItems() / 2; count != 0; --count)
            {
                //Set temp2 before temp
                temp2 = head;
                while(temp2->next != temp)
                    temp2 = temp2->next;
                cout << temp2->data << endl;

                //Set temp before temp2
                temp = head;
                while(temp->next != temp2)
                    temp = temp->next;
                cout << temp->data << endl;
            }
            cout << "EXIT LOOP" << endl;
        }

    private:
        struct node
        {
            string data;
            node *next;
        }

    *head;
};

int main()
{
    LinkedList names;

    names.addItem("This");
    names.addItem("is");
    names.addItem("a");
    names.addItem("test");
    names.addItem("sentence");
    names.addItem("for");
    names.addItem("the");
    names.addItem("linked");
    names.addItem("list");

    names.printList();

    cout << endl;

    names.addToHead("insert");

    names.printList();

    cout << endl;

    cout << names.countItems() << endl;

    cout << "Print reverse: " << endl;
    names.printReverse();
    cout << endl;

    return 0;
}

Now I'm not sure exactly why my code crashes, any help is appreciated!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
What do you mean your code crashes? How does it crash? What happens when you run it? –  Chris Dargis Jan 5 '13 at 22:59
    
Since the code works with an odd number of elements (without the "insert" element), but fails with an even number, that should give you a hint... –  JaredC Jan 5 '13 at 23:03
    
@SethCarnegie: Why do you say that? –  Jon Purdy Jan 5 '13 at 23:03
3  
+1 Just because you seem willing to learn stuff, which is (sadly) rarely seen in beginners questions on Stack Overflow. –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 23:41
2  
@DougRamsey Sorry for not providing more info about that. This was my first post here, I'll keep it in mind next time. –  Marcan Jan 6 '13 at 0:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Within printList, you have to also check for head == NULL, otherwise you are acessing members of a pointer pointing to NULL. The following should work.

    void printList()
    {
        node *temp = head;
        while(temp != NULL) // don't access ->next
        {
            cout << temp->data << endl;
            temp = temp->next;
        }
    }

In printReverse() I really can't understand why you take half of the counts of the elements to print and print two elements in every iteration. However, you really don't need a for-loop here. You can simply stop as soon as temp == head after your loop, since then you just printed the head. And only print one element, the one whose next pointer points to the previously printed element.

Another, recursive, attempt to solve the problem looks like this:

    void printReverse()
    {
        printReverseRecursive(head);
    }
    void printReverseRecursive(node *n)
    {
        if(n) {
            printReverseRecursive(n->next);
            cout << n->data << endl;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not the real problem. The problem is in the fact that count never reaches zero when countItems() is odd. –  akappa Jan 5 '13 at 23:09
    
@akappa Nope. countItems() / 2 evaluates to an int. (Although the use of a double as a counter is totally WTF) –  Andrei Tita Jan 5 '13 at 23:10
    
@AndreiTita: oops, true. Point taken. –  akappa Jan 5 '13 at 23:11
    
@akappa Yeah you're right, however this was the first thing I've seen. Updated my answer. –  leemes Jan 5 '13 at 23:13
    
+1, i should have looked at yours before writing mine. But this is ridiculously easy (for us) –  acidzombie24 Jan 5 '13 at 23:37
for(double count = countItems() / 2; count != 0; --count)
            {
                //Set temp2 before temp
                temp2 = head;
                while(temp2->next != temp)
                    temp2 = temp2->next;
                cout << temp2->data<< "   " << endl;

                //Set temp before temp2
                temp = head;
                while(temp->next != temp2)
                    temp = temp->next;
                cout << temp->data << "   "<< endl;
            }
            cout << "EXIT LOOP" << endl;

Your program crashes because of the second loop. Hint: Go through it with only two elements added to the list, e.g."Hello" -> "You" -> NULL. And look closer to your loop-predicate (temp->next != temp2).

share|improve this answer

You should consider re-writing your loop to start at the last element (as you have done) and have your loop condition stop when you reach the head. Having double the code inside your for loop, along with the odd count/2 logic is certainly confusing you (and us).

temp = [last element]

while not at head
    print temp
    temp = previous element

print head

Note that you already have the code for the temp = previous element part:

temp2 = head;
while(temp2->next != temp)
    temp2 = temp2->next;

Since I assume this is an assignment of some type, I'm intentionally not giving you the c++ code for this. Even if it isn't assignment, working through it with this in mind should be the learning experience you're after. However, if you give it a shot and still have a problem, feel free to update your question (or post a new one).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. It isn't for an assignment, but still I much prefer not being spoon fed the answer like that. I'll see if I can figure it out by myself after your hint. –  Marcan Jan 5 '13 at 23:37
    
@Marcan You have all of the basic elements in your code already, you just need to remove some code and modify your loop to be a while loop instead of a for loop. –  JaredC Jan 5 '13 at 23:41
    
This isn't even right you can't loop backwards... Its a single link –  acidzombie24 Jan 6 '13 at 0:06
    
@acid That's part of the challenge of his question. Note that I didn't say temp2 = temp2->previous our anything like that, because obviously that would require a doubly linked list. But that doesn't mean that there isn't a way to get the previous element. Other answers suggest using recursion, which is viable for small lists, but if the list can be large and you need to print it backwards rarely (hopefully), there are ways to get the previous element (e.g. walk the list again, keep a separate list, etc.). This seems to be for learning so I doubt performance is a concern anyway. –  JaredC Jan 6 '13 at 0:09
    
@JaredC: After thinking about it, there is a way to implement a loop without it being crazy painful (like n*n). Ok thats good enough for me –  acidzombie24 Jan 6 '13 at 1:33
void printReverse()
{
    printReverse(head) //kickstart the overload function below
}
void printReverse(node *n)
{
    if(n == 0) return;
    printReverse(n->next);   //print the next
    cout << n->data << endl; //before printing me
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.