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Is there a way to make a variable width font act like a fixed width font in HTML?

For example, if I have the sentence, "The quick grey fox jumped over the lazy dog" displayed in "Courier New", a fixed width font, it would be wider overall than if it was in a variable width font like, "Arial". I would like to use "Arial" instead of "Courier New" but have the characters fixed width.

Example of variable width:
The quick grey fox jumped over the lazy dog.

Example of fixed width:

The quick grey fox jumped over the lazy dog

Notice how close the characters are to each other in the word "quick" and "grey" in each example.

share|improve this question
    
HTML or TLF? Which one do you want? Those are two completely different rendering technologies which require different solutions. –  RIAstar Jan 5 '13 at 23:24
    
That's true. What I'm starting with is a list of text. I can choose either technology to use in this case. But I can create a new question. –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:32
    
You seem to be getting a lot of HTML answers and I can't think of a quick fix for TLF. So maybe you can base your choice of technology on that. –  RIAstar Jan 5 '13 at 23:40
    
It's looking that way. I've created a separate question for TLF since someone visiting this post in the future may find answers for two different technologies confusing. –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:43
    
The HTML approach may work for TLF as well. I would have to create span elements, and set the width and text alignment of each. Unfortunately, the HTML import in TLF is very very slow (TLF 2.0). –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 8 '13 at 5:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not with just CSS. I would recommend you use the popular Lettering.js (you'll need jQuery for it) to generate span tags around each character, then set an width across all the characters.

.monospace > span {
  display: inline-block; /* Enable widths */
  width: 1em;            /* Set width across all characters */
  text-align: center;    /* Even out spacing */
}

Test Case

share|improve this answer
    
Could I remove the requirement by adding span tags before hand? What does the body { font: 16px/1.5 Arial, sans-serif } do? –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:55
    
If you want to hand code the span tags into the document, that would work also. You do not then need Lettering.js. The font declaration sets a base font-size of 16px, a base line-height of 1.5em (or 24px) and a font-family of Arial, with a backup of sans-serif, on the entire document. It is the shorthand of using all of these properties separately. –  JoeJ Jan 6 '13 at 0:03

The only thing I can think of is to put each letter in an HTML element, and style that element something along the lines of:

width: 8px;         /* Whatever fixed width you want here */
display: block;     /* Force the width to be respected. See also: inline-block */
float: left;        /* So it won't be 1-per-line. Not needed for inline-block */
text-align: center; /* So the character appears in the middle of the block */

I'm not familiar with Flex, but if I were to implement this approach, I would put together some Javascript that would generate all the elements for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Each character is already in it's own span tags so I think this just might work. :) –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:19
2  
This does what the question asks for, but this means that letters do not look like evenly spaced; e.g., in “World”, the first two letters seem to be much closer to each other than the rest. The point is that to create monospace impression, you need a real monospace font. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jan 5 '13 at 23:52

The result should be crappy as proportional fonts aren't made for that.

Nonetheless, you can achieve that with individual span around characters: http://jsfiddle.net/rvYES/

body {
  font: normal 100%/1.5 Arial;
}

span {
  outline: 1px dotted darkred;
}
span:nth-of-type(even) {
  outline-color: blue;
}

.w-fixed span {
  display: inline-block;
  min-width: 1em;
}

I added visual clues (outline) to see what's going on and used min-width just in case, not width.
This method will cause a huge problem of accessibility with screen readers, for blind and partially sighted people using these assistive technologies. Letters being into individual span will be spelled / read out
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P
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?

pun intended

share|improve this answer
    
Typographically the result would be crappy, but there is no reason why screen readers would spell out each letter. (Poor screen readers might do odd things, though.) –  Jukka K. Korpela Jan 5 '13 at 23:44
    
:) What is the CSS in the body tag doing? I've seen it in more than a few places now. –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:46
    
@JukkaK.Korpela If you were developing an AT, you could've reasons to behave differently when seeing letters in individual span rather than in a normal sentence, though I don't have the test cases from real world that led them to this decision. And if you want to style the first letter from a paragraph, well at least CSS has :first-letter –  FelipeAls Jan 5 '13 at 23:55
    
@1.21gigawatts font is the shorthand property for a bunch of font-something properties and also line-height. Using percentages for font-size is due to using em unit (not pixels) and a bug of most versions of IE with em unit on this particular element clagnut.com/blog/348 (IE is fine with ems on any other element...). /1.5 is the line-height value (unitless) that will be inherited in the whole document. –  FelipeAls Jan 6 '13 at 0:01

You might be able to use the letter-spacing CSS property to get what you want. By definition, monospace fonts have the same character width unlike serif or sans-serif. Using letter-spacing is your best bet W3C Reference

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't the letter-spacing value just added to the default kerning for a given font? While it would increase or decrease the spacing between each letter, it won't make the spacing uniform, correct? But if this meets 1.21 gigawatts' needs, it's definitely a better option than my suggestion. :) –  Ashley Ross Jan 5 '13 at 23:15
    
I think Ashley's right. I think it adds or subtracts to the values in the font's kerning table. –  1.21 gigawatts Jan 5 '13 at 23:20
    
The letter-spacing value specifies added spacing between characters (kerning is something completely different), so it would not make the spacing uniform at all. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jan 5 '13 at 23:46

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