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Ok, i am a relatively new programmer and spend way to much time umming and ahhing over different ways to write certain code.

Can anyone please say whether there is any fundamental difference between the following and if any should be preferred over the other:

    if (empty($array)) {
        //must be an empty array 
    }

    if (true === empty($array)) {
        //must be an empty array 
    }

    if (is_array($array) && count($array) === 0) {
        //must be an empty array    
    }

Sorry if this seems trivial but no joke, this stuff takes up a lot of my time deciding and ultimately at some level there has to be a difference in either correctness, robustness or performance (or a combination)

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8 Answers

Your first two examples are identical, since empty() will always return either TRUE or FALSE. The only thing the second example changes is whether the check for this is implicit or explicit.

It's also important to note that empty() isn't used only on arrays. It checks to see if the value of a variable is considered equivalent to FALSE. An empty array is just one of these values, which also includes things like empty strings and zeroes.

The only real difference between using empty() versus something like if ($value) is that empty() includes an implicit call to isset(), so it works even if the variable you're checking doesn't exist.

If you're sure that the variable will be an array, then all three of your options are equivalent. In fact, all of the following are equivalent for checking for elements in an array, provided the variable exists and is an array type:

  • if ($array)
  • if (empty($array))
  • if (empty($array) === TRUE)
  • if (count($array) === 0)
  • if (count($array))

The only differences between the examples in your question are the explicit type check in the third example, and the implicit isset() check in the first two. If you're sure that the variable exists, and is an array, then all three are functionally the same.

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Yes there are differences. I have no clue why you are puzzled so much. So first reduce this a bit:

if (empty($array)) {
    // is just empty - array or not
}

if (true === empty($array)) {
    // is just empty - array or not
}

These two are technically the same. empty is a boolean expression, so comparing with true is true yeah. So you could just pick the first of those two here, but you could also write more and take the second. But well, you get it.

However with:

if (is_array($array) && count($array) === 0) {
    //must be an empty array    
}

You explicitly test if the type is Array and that array has no values. You can also do this here (just FYI):

if ($array && is_array($array)) {
    //must be an empty array    
}

Because an array with no values equals boolean false. Questions? Comments?

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Im not puzzled but the code logic, but instead as to how far one should go when coding. Obviously empty($array) is going to suffice mostly but is any of the examples going to produce more robust, performat code etc.. and worth the extra verboseness –  Marty Wallace Jan 5 '13 at 23:21
    
If you want verboseness use if ( !isset($array) || !is_array($array) || (is_array && empty($array)) ) but you should know what comes before that in your own code so, as admirable as it is to seek extra verbosity, it's usually not necessary. –  Popnoodles Jan 5 '13 at 23:23
    
Well, if you know the input is an array, you can do the boolean check and not more is needed. If however you are not sure about the type, you need to check the type as well with PHP. It's loosely typed so at important places (e.g. with input), you sometimes need to be verbose because it is required with PHP. Some compromises are possible with casting (e.g. cast to (array) to ensure having an array) or using of array in paramter-type-hinting of functions which will make PHP explode if wrong type is given. –  hakre Jan 5 '13 at 23:23
    
Short version: you need to know your own how far you need to go. In my eyes the more important part is to know the language, this comes with practice. Especially with variable types and booleans, you can have quite some fun, if you know these tables in-and-out when woke up in the middle of the night from memory, you're probably ready: php.net/manual/en/types.comparisons.php ;) –  hakre Jan 5 '13 at 23:28
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If you know it's an array

if (empty($array))

or

if (!count($array))

if you're not sure the array was set

if (isset($array) && !count($array))

if you're not sure it's actually an array

if (is_array($array) && !count($array))

If you want verboseness use

if ( !isset($array) || !is_array($array) || (is_array && empty($array)) )

but you should know what comes before that in your own code so, as admirable as it is to seek extra verbosity, it's usually not necessary.

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Did you just edit this answer like 5 times in last 7 seconds? :-D –  cypher Jan 5 '13 at 23:18
    
@cypher - Some of us are tweakers. –  Popnoodles Jan 5 '13 at 23:19
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Well, the only difference is that in the first two, the argument doesn't really have to be an array - is_empty(false) will output false aswell, but that should not be a problem.

I have always used the first and simplest approach.

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You should go with if (emtpy($array)). There is no functional difference to the second example and the first example is much more readable. The third example seems unnecessarily verbose.

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The first one is the correct one for me.

The second one is not necessary since php's empty() function can only return boolean values and you don't need to typecheck the return value like this:

if (true === empty($array)) {
    //must be an empty array 
}

The third check also checks if the variable type is really an array. If you would only check for count($a) == 0 and $a is not an array php will generate a notice.

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It depends on the context which way you should prefer.

empty($array)

The simplest and most common/used way is

if (empty($array))

If will be true every time the variable $array is on of these:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • 0.0 (0 as a float)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • $var; (a variable declared, but without a value)

(see here: empty)

true === empty($array)

The second version with

if (true === empty($array))

is unnecessary. The function empty returns a boolean, you haven't to ensure the type is boolean with ===. It's engough to write

if (true == empty($array))

and this is equal to the first version.

is_array($array) && count($array) === 0

The last version is interresting. It tests the variable $array to be an array. You wont compare the result of count typesafe with ===. It will return only numbers. To ensure the number is larger than zero it's enough to treat it like a boolean like here

if (is_array($array) && count($array))

This case is neccesarry if you aren't sure $array is an array but it must be. In other cases the first is the best way.

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1. You should understand the differences between == and === in order to know that.

The === sign would check if the value AND the type of both sides are the same. So 0 == "0" is true, but 0 is not === "0".

2. You should understand better what you want to do: You want to be sure that your array exists? You want to be sure that your array is empty? You want both?

If you know you have an array, but not sure if it's empty or not, the best solution will be:

if (empty($ARRAY)) {
    /* code if array is empty */
}

Please notice that this code would be executed if the array isn't exists. To check the array existence, you might want to wrap the code above with:

if (isset($ARRAY)) {
    /* code if array is set */
}

3. You asked if there are differences. Let's see:

if (empty($array)) {
    //must be an empty array 
}

if (true === empty($array)) {
    //must be an empty array 
}

The both codes checks if the array is empty. The first one is more popular way to write it, but they will both do the work.

if (is_array($array) && count($array) === 0) {
    //must be an empty array    
}

This one is little bit different: the is_array part of the condition will check if the array exists, which is check that your other codes won't do. Please notice that count() returns 0 for unset variables, so is_array if you want to check if the array exists.

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