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I would like to ask, if there is a way, to use variables in a class, that were declared out of it.

Example:

$foo = 'bar';
class foobar{
    function example(){
        echo "foo{$foo}";
    }
}
$foobar = new foobar;
$foobar->example();

This code produces a notice: Notice: Undefined variable: foo Is there a way to make it work? Or is there some work-around?

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1  
Yes. Simply make an attribute to the class and build a constructor that sets an argument (namely the variable that you pass in) to the aforementioned attribute. –  Jack Maney Jan 5 '13 at 23:39
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use a construct to import it or use the global keyword. You could do something like this:

$var = 'value';
class foobar {
    private $classVar;
    function __construct($param) {
        $this->classVar = $param;
    }
}

And initiate it like this:

$var = 'value';
$inst = new foobar($var);

Or you can use global variables (which I wouldn't recommend in this case) and do something like this:

$var = 'value';
class foobar {
    global $var;
    function show() {
       echo $var;
    }
}

UPDATE: To use a class within another class, it may be instantiated in the constructor if its instance is needed throughout implementation, or it may be instantiated only when needed.

To create a reference to another class inside the constructor, do something like this:

class class1 {
    private $someVar;

    function __construct() {
        $this->someVar = 'success';
    }

    function doStuff() {
        return $this->someVar;
    }
}

class class2 {
    private $ref;
    private $val;
    function __construct() {
        $this->ref = new class1();
        $this->val = $this->ref->doStuff();
        // $this->val now holds the value 'success'
    }
}

$inst = new class2(); // upon calling this, the $val variable holds the value 'success'

Or you can call it only when needed, like so:

class class1 {
    private $someVar;

    function __construct() {
        $this->someVar = 'success';
    }

    function doStuff() {
        return $this->someVar;
    }
}

class class2 {
    private $ref;
    private $val;
    function __construct() {
        // do something
    }
    function assign() {
        $this->ref = new class1();
        $this->val = $this->ref->doStuff();
        // $this->val now holds the value 'success'
    }
}

$inst = new class2(); // the $val variable holds no value yet
$inst->assign(); // now $val holds 'success';

Hope that helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
I would be interested to know down-voted this answer and for what reason. I gave more than one way to accomplish the task and demonstrated how to use it instead of just giving half of the code. Some people on this site bewilder me. –  danL Jan 5 '13 at 23:51
    
Thank you very much for the answer! I find it the most complete :) –  Chris Illusion Jan 6 '13 at 0:01
    
Thank you for the acceptance! I'm not sure why people on this site down-vote others for no reason, I was just trying to help. If you need any further help please just let me know and I'll be happy to help you. –  danL Jan 6 '13 at 0:02
    
I was playing a bit now with this newly gained knowledge and found out, that I can pass even classes like this. So I came out with: $this->foo_class->another_example() and it was actually working. However, what would be the proper way of using a different class in a class? Thank you very much :) –  Chris Illusion Jan 6 '13 at 0:29
    
The way you're doing it is correct. Depending on your needs, you can setup the instance of the imported class inside the constructor or you can create it only when needed. I will update my answer showing you how to do both. P.S. If you don't mind, please up-vote my answer if it was helpful, I like having a good reputation on this site. :) –  danL Jan 6 '13 at 0:34

You could give this argument to your class with a constructor

class foobar{    

    private $foo;

    public function __construct($name) {
        $this->foo = $name;
    }
}

and then use it.

Or what PeeHaa means, you could change your method to

function example($param){
    echo "foo{$param}";
}

and call it like this

$foobar->example($foo);
share|improve this answer
    
Either this or inject it directly into the method that needs it. –  PeeHaa Jan 5 '13 at 23:43

Yes add

class foobar{
    function example(){

        global $foo;

        echo "foo{$foo}";
    }
}

** putting it in another class is better though, or passing it to the method you're using is better too **

share|improve this answer
1  
Why globals are bad? –  PeeHaa Jan 5 '13 at 23:40
    
I updated my answer with that hint –  Shehabix Jan 5 '13 at 23:42
1  
This works, but is bad style, especially when used in classes. –  Nic Jan 5 '13 at 23:42

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