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I have an object, for example:

var o = {
  a: 1
};

The user does:

o.a = 2;

How can I know if the o object has been modified? I cannot touch the o object so I cannot use Object.defineProperties().

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Do you want to get notified on every change or just have a way to check it? If you just want to check I would say generate a hashcode of the object and compare when necessary. –  Nic Jan 6 '13 at 0:06
    
Just have a way to check it, but how can I generate this hash? –  Gabriel Llamas Jan 6 '13 at 0:21

4 Answers 4

Since you are in the node.js environment and thus don't have to care about crappy old JavaScript engines (i.e. old browsers) you can use Object.defineProperty() to define properties with accessor functions. This allows you to execute a custom function whenever a certain property is read/written - so you can simply log the write and e.g. store it in a separate property.

var o = {};
Object.defineProperty(o, 'a', {
    get: function() {
        return this.__a;
    },
    set: function(value) {
        this.__a = value;
        this.__a_changed = true;
    }
});
o.__a = 1;

Whenever a value is assigned to o.a the __a_changed property will be set. Of course it would be even cleaner to execute whatever you want to do on change right in the set function - but it obviously depends on your code if you can do so in a useful way.

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Same as the first answer, I cannot touch the o object because it's created from a config file with a third-party module. –  Gabriel Llamas Jan 6 '13 at 0:24
2  
You could still convert all the plain properties to accessor-backed properties. –  ThiefMaster Jan 6 '13 at 0:26

The easiest thing would obviously be to just check if the value is different than what you initialized it as. Another option would be to use Object.defineProperty.

var o = {};
var aValue = 2;
Object.defineProperty(o, "a", { 
    get: function() { return aValue; }, 
    set: function(newValue) { 
        aValue = newValue;
        // trigger event or set flag that it was changed
    } 
});
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The problem is that I cannot touch the o object because it's created from a config file with a third-party module. –  Gabriel Llamas Jan 6 '13 at 0:22
    
Assuming you really can't touch the o object, you may not have a lot of options other than checking the value against an expected value. There aren't any events that are automatically triggered when a plain ole Object has a property changed. –  Andrew Hubbs Jan 6 '13 at 0:29
var o_backup = o.a;

if(o.a != o_backup){
// function to execute
}

Basically, you are just creating a variable which will save the a from the object o and then you're checking if it has been modified or not.

Also, you can do a setInterval() function if you want to check if it has been modified more than once.

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No offense, but this is not a very elegant solution. –  Trevor Jan 6 '13 at 4:09

You could always wrap o with your own setter getter if the defineProperty doesn't do the job for you.

var myO = {
    o: o, // original o
    changed: false,
    set: function (prop, val) {
        this.o[prop] = val;
        this[prop + "IsChanged"] = true;
    },
    get: function (prop) {
       return this.o[prop];
    }
};
myO.set("a", 2);
console.log(myO.aIsChanged); // true

A better solution would be to execute an event using something like Backbone.Events to exeute someting myO.on("change", function () { ... })

var myO = {
        o: o, // original o
        changed: false,
        set: function (prop, val) {
            this.o[prop] = val;
            this.trigger("change", prop, val);
        },
        get: function (prop) {
           return this.o[prop];
        }
    };

_.extend(myO, Backbone.events);

myO.on("change", function (prop, val) {
   // Do stuff with the change
});

myO.set("a", 1);

I'm using the Underscore library's extend method here, fyi.

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