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I have defined the following structure below.

typedef union
{
    struct
    {
        unsigned command:15;
        unsigned acknowledge:1;
    };
    struct
    {
        unsigned short uicommand;
    };
    struct
    {
        Byte command_bytes[2];
    };
}TCOMMAND;

After then declaring a variable of type TCOMMAND E.G

TCOMMAND mycommand
int x=sizeof(mycommand)

The value of x is 4 bytes instead of 2. Enlightenment on the problem will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C/C++ unsigned means unsigned int and even if you don't assign all of the bits of a bit field, the compiler will still size your structure to the data type specified.

So assuming a 32 bit int (which is the default in Visual C++) the first structure of your union is the same as:

struct
{
    unsigned int command:15;
    unsigned int acknowledge:1;
    unsigned int __unused:16;
};

Which is four bytes. Use an unsigned short in your first structure if you want it to be only two bytes:

struct
{
    unsigned short command:15;
    unsigned short acknowledge:1;
};
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Excellent. Worked perfectly!!! –  Peter H Jan 6 '13 at 1:09

Maybe it's because unsigned int has 4-byte alignment. If you use unsigned short for the command and acknowledge members, the structure will be 2 bytes large.

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Yes.. Worked perfectly Thankyou –  Peter H Jan 6 '13 at 1:10

This is caused by the compiler options. Newer compilers make memory alignments. This also affects the size of your unions/structures. There are some pragma solutions like #pragma pack. see and try the code below.

#pragma pack(push, 1)
typedef union
{
    struct
    {
        unsigned command:15;
        unsigned acknowledge:1;
    };
    struct
    {
        unsigned short uicommand;
    };
    struct
    {
        Byte command_bytes[2];
    };
}TCOMMAND;
#pragma pack(pop)

push, 1 tells compiler to align block to 1 byte. this was the default value for older compilers but probably changed with the newer ones.

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Not quite.. Still came out as 4 bytes.. That #pragma pack really didn't pack at all.. Actually it did nothing visible.Declaring the first part of the structure as unsigned short worked though.. Thanks. –  Peter H Jan 6 '13 at 1:09
    
Then my answer was wrong for this case. But still keep in mind that compilers can cause different sizing issues as optimizations and my answer is correct for other scenarios. –  Emir Akaydın Jan 6 '13 at 1:11
    
Actually your answer did help. I used TCOMMAND in another structure I created and without the #pragma pack statement wrapped around both structures, they were misaligned. Your answer is correct!!!. I'm going to wrap all of my stuctures around this now!!! Thanks. Peter –  Peter H Jan 6 '13 at 23:01
    
I'm glad i could help. I had similar problems when trying to use an old pci camera card SDK from C++/CLI which was written in VC++ 6.0. –  Emir Akaydın Jan 6 '13 at 23:05

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