Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two numpy arrays holding 2d vectors:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([[ 0.999875,  0.015836],
              [ 0.997443,  0.071463],
              [ 0.686554,  0.727078],
              [ 0.93322 ,  0.359305]])

b = np.array([[ 0.7219  ,  0.691997],
              [ 0.313656,  0.949537],
              [ 0.507926,  0.861401],
              [ 0.818131,  0.575031],
              [ 0.117956,  0.993019]])

As you can see, a.shape is (4,2) and b.shape is (5,2).

Now, I can get the results I want thusly:

In [441]: np.array([np.cross(av, bv) for bv in b for av in a]).reshape(5, 4)
Out[441]: 
array([[ 0.680478,  0.638638, -0.049784,  0.386403],
       [ 0.944451,  0.924694,  0.423856,  0.773429],
       [ 0.85325 ,  0.8229  ,  0.222097,  0.621377],
       [ 0.562003,  0.515094, -0.200055,  0.242672],
       [ 0.991027,  0.982051,  0.595998,  0.884323]])

My question is: What's a more 'numpythonic' way of getting the above (i.e without the nested list comprensions)? I've tried every combination of np.cross() I can think of, and I usually get results like this:

In [438]: np.cross(a, b.T, axisa=1, axisb=0)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ValueError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-438-363c0765a7f9> in <module>()
----> 1 np.cross(a, b.T, axisa=1, axisb=0)

D:\users\ae4652t\Python27\lib\site-packages\numpy\core\numeric.p<snipped>
   1242     if a.shape[0] == 2:
   1243         if (b.shape[0] == 2):
-> 1244             cp = a[0]*b[1] - a[1]*b[0]
   1245             if cp.ndim == 0:
   1246                 return cp

ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (4) (5) 
share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to take an inner product? What you are doing is not a cross product. –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 0:40
1  
I think I'm taking 20 cross-products on a 4 x 5 grid, no? That's the function I'm calling in the list comprehension –  subnivean Jan 6 '13 at 0:42
    
I see what your doing, it probably isnt worth it to optimize this unless these arrays are very large. –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 1:13
1  
@EOL I agree, and I am now very curious to see if there is a way to take all combinations between two array's by row more efficiently then the way I proposed. –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 2:50
1  
My arrays aren't very large yet; just wanted to be ready. That, and any time I see a for when I'm using numpy makes me feel a little queasy :-) Thanks for all the answers w/timings. –  subnivean Jan 6 '13 at 4:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I haven't timed my code, but I am almost certain there is no more numpythonic way of doing this than the nice and simple:

>>> np.cross(a[None], b[:, None])
array([[ 0.68047849,  0.63863842, -0.0497843 ,  0.38640316],
       [ 0.94445125,  0.92469424,  0.42385605,  0.77342875],
       [ 0.85324981,  0.82290048,  0.22209648,  0.62137629],
       [ 0.5620032 ,  0.51509455, -0.20005522,  0.24267187],
       [ 0.99102692,  0.98205036,  0.59599795,  0.88432301]])

Broadcasting is always the answer...

share|improve this answer
    
Nice; this should be the accepted answer. Although "always" is a bit of an exaggeration-- there are many cases where broadcasting results in impractically large intermediate arrays. –  DSM Jan 6 '13 at 3:49
    
Always as in except when not, of course... ;-) –  Jaime Jan 6 '13 at 3:51
    
Updated my post for timings! As I have never seen the use of [None] before is there any difference between that and reshape(1,-1)? –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 3:52
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. I might suggest np.newaxis in place of None, but I'm not sure it reads any more clearly. And thanks for the link; I'll bone up again on broadcasting. –  subnivean Jan 6 '13 at 4:02
    
@Ophion I used to always do explicit reshapes, as you suggest, but lately I tend to lean more to slicing with None, since it usually allows for more compact code. Which is the same reason I go with None over np.newaxis. –  Jaime Jan 6 '13 at 4:21

I thought a bit more on this.

>>> a
array([[ 0.999875,  0.015836],
       [ 0.997443,  0.071463],
       [ 0.686554,  0.727078],
       [ 0.93322 ,  0.359305]])
>>> b
array([[ 0.7219  ,  0.691997],
       [ 0.313656,  0.949537],
       [ 0.507926,  0.861401],
       [ 0.818131,  0.575031],
       [ 0.117956,  0.993019]])
>>> c = np.tile(a, (b.shape[0], 1))
>>> d = np.repeat(b, a.shape[0], axis=0)
>>> np.cross(c, d).reshape(5,4)
array([[ 0.68047849,  0.63863842, -0.0497843 ,  0.38640316],
       [ 0.94445125,  0.92469424,  0.42385605,  0.77342875],
       [ 0.85324981,  0.82290048,  0.22209648,  0.62137629],
       [ 0.5620032 ,  0.51509455, -0.20005522,  0.24267187],
       [ 0.99102692,  0.98205036,  0.59599795,  0.88432301]])

Some timings:

import timeit

s="""
import numpy as np
a=np.random.random(100).reshape(-1, 2)
b=np.random.random(1000).reshape(-1, 2)
"""

ophion="""
np.cross(np.tile(a,(b.shape[0],1)),np.repeat(b,a.shape[0],axis=0))"""

subnivean="""
np.array([np.cross(av, bv) for bv in b for av in a]).reshape(b.shape[0], a.shape[0])"""

DSM="""
np.outer(b[:,1], a[:,0]) - np.outer(b[:,0], a[:,1])"""

Jamie="""
np.cross(a[None], b[:, None, :])"""

h=timeit.timeit(subnivean,setup=s,number=10)
m=timeit.timeit(ophion,setup=s,number=10)
d=timeit.timeit(DSM,setup=s,number=10)
j=timeit.timeit(Jamie,setup=s,number=10)

print "subnivean's method took",h,'seconds.'
print "Ophion's method took",m,'seconds.'
print "DSM's method took",d,'seconds.'

"
subnivean's method took 1.99507117271 seconds.
Ophion's method took 0.0149450302124 seconds.
DSM's method took 0.0040500164032 seconds.
Jamie's method took 0.00390195846558 seconds."

For when the length of a=10 and b=100:

"
subnivean's method took 0.0217308998108 seconds.
Ophion's method took 0.00046181678772 seconds.
DSM's method took 0.000531911849976 seconds.
Jamie's method took 0.000334024429321 seconds."

Hmm you switched the order of the cross product again, both answers are shown if you want (5,4) or (4,5).

share|improve this answer
    
No, I want the exact 5 x 4 array shown above –  subnivean Jan 6 '13 at 0:44
    
Updated for what you wanted. –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 1:55
1  
Hey, that's not fair: when timing mine, you're not just testing my solution (using np.outer), you're including the listcomp line, which is the OP's solution I included only to check the answers.. –  DSM Jan 6 '13 at 1:57
    
Ah, I apologize- updating now. –  Ophion Jan 6 '13 at 1:58
1  
+1 for putting the timings together –  subnivean Jan 6 '13 at 4:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.