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Having gone through the documentation, it would seem the following case should work, but the result is always nil. (This is for iOS sdk 6)

NSString *releaseDate = @"2012-10-22T00:00:00-07:00";
NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
NSDate *date = nil;

[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-ddTHH:mm:ss-ZZZZZ"];
date = [dateFormatter dateFromString:releaseDate];

NSLog(@"Result date: %@", date); // Logs "(null)"

Any insights?

Thanks in advance for any help.

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2 Answers 2

How about you try this. If your date string is unlocalized as I am guessing, even Apple suggests you could use something like this:

struct tm tmDate;
const char *formatString = "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%z";

strptime_l(releaseDate, formatString, & tmDate, NULL);
date = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970: mktime(& tmDate)];

NSLog(@"Result date: %@", date);

Your release date will have to be a C string though, as in const char *releaseDate = "2012-10-22T00:00:00-07:00";, which you can get also from the UTF8String method of NSString.

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Thanks. I will try that. Still, don't get why the documented format would not work! –  izk Jan 6 '13 at 2:19

Ok. A bit of re-reading of the docs revealed my misunderstandings:

NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
NSString *releaseDate = @"2012-10-22T00:00:00-07:00";
NSDate *date = nil;

[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZZZZZ"];
date = [dateFormatter dateFromString:releaseDate];

NSLog(@"Result date: %@", date);
NSLog(@"Result string: %@", [dateFormatter stringFromDate:date]);

The "T" had to be enclosed in apostrophes and the "ZZZZZ" for time zone already accounts for the "-" so it had to be removed.

Now it works as expected.

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