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I'm using the following code to calculate and display the final score for a math game in C++.

int score = (correctNumber / 3) * 100;
cout << score;

The variable "correctNumber" is always a value between 0 and 3. However, unless "correctNumber" = 3, then the variable "score" always equals "0". When "correctNumber" equals 3 then "score" equals 100.

Say "correctNumber" was equal to 2. Shouldn't "score" be 67 then? Is this some issue with int variable type being unable to calculate decimal points?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are doing math as integer so 1 / 3 is 0.

Try:

int score = (100 * correctNumber) / 3

and if you want to round:

int score = (100 * correctNumber + 1) / 3
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wouldn't this break though when the correctNumber = 1? –  codedude Jan 6 '13 at 5:28
    
(100 * 1 + 1) / 3 = 33.666667 which rounds to 34 –  codedude Jan 6 '13 at 5:29
    
hmmm...it comes out as 33 when I run it. Does C++ always round down? –  codedude Jan 6 '13 at 5:31
    
Arithmetic with integers means only getting the integer part in the result but also on the intermediate computations. This is know as truncation. So, if you actually want to round the result (at the end) it is recommended using float or double and finally invoking a rounding method. My proposed solutions if for a question of efficiency for your specific scenario. –  OnaBai Jan 6 '13 at 9:40
    
Ah, I see. Thanks! –  codedude Jan 6 '13 at 14:12

I'm assuming correctNumber is an int, based on what you described. What's happening is integer truncation. When you divide an int by an int, the result always rounds down:

1/3 = 0.3333 = 0 as an integer
2/3 = 0.6667 = 0 as an integer
3/3 = 1.0000 = 1 as an integer

The easy way to remedy this here is to multiply it first:

int score = correctNumber * 100 / 3;

However, this still leaves you with 66 for 2, not 67. A clear and simple way of dealing with that (and many other rounding situations, though the rounding style is unconfigurable) is std::round, included since C++11:

int score = std::round(currentNumber * 100. / 3);

In the example, the dot in 100. makes 100 a double (it's the same thing as 100.0), so the result of the operation will be the floating-point value you want, not a pre-truncated value passed in as a floating-point value. That means you'll end up with 66.66666... going into std::round instead of 66.

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Your guess is correct. int can't store real numbers.

But you can multiply first, and then divide, like

score = correctNumber * 100 / 3;

score will have 0, 33, 66, 100, depending on values of correctNumber

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The problem is that (correctNumber / 3) is an integer, so you can't get 0.666 or any fraction to multiply by 100, which what I believe is you want.

You could try to force it to be a float like this:

int score = ((float)correctNumber / 3) * 100;

This, however, will give you 66 instead of 67, cause it doesn't round up. You could use C99 round() for that.

int score = round(((float)correctNumber / 3) * 100);

UPDATE:

You can also use + 0.5 to round, like this:

int score = (correctNumber / 3.0f) * 100.0f + 0.5f;
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Do I need to add a #include <...> for this to work? –  codedude Jan 6 '13 at 14:14
    
@codedude yes, you need #include <math.h> –  imreal Jan 6 '13 at 22:10
    
I did so but Visual Studio is telling me that "identifier round is undefined." –  codedude Jan 7 '13 at 5:44
    
@codedude it is part of C99, you can see by using gcc/g++. Without it you can use the old + 0.5, I will update the answer. –  imreal Jan 7 '13 at 7:19

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